All in the Family: Absolutism, Revolution, and Democracy in Middle Eastern Monarchies

Front Cover
SUNY Press, May 27, 1999 - History - 352 pages
0 Reviews
Michael Herb proposes a new paradigm for understanding politics in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf. He critiques the theory of the rentier state and argues that we must put political institutions—and specifically monarchism—at the center of any explanation of Gulf politics. All in the Family provides a compelling and fresh analysis of the importance of monarchism in the region, and points out the crucial role of the ruling families in creating monarchal regimes. It addresses the issue of democratization in the Middle Eastern monarchies, arguing that the prospects for the gradual emergence of constitutional monarchy are better than is often thought.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Emergence of Dynastic Monarchy and the Causes of Its Persistence
21
Arabian Society and the Emergence of the PetroState
51
The Dynasties The Al Sabah and the Al Saud
67
The Dynasties The Al Thani Al Khalifa Al Nahayan Al Maktum and Al Said
109
Strategies of Regime and Opposition in the Dynastic Monarchies
157
Libya and Afghanistan
183
Five Nondynastic Monarchies
209
Dynastic Monarchism and the Persistence of Hereditary Rule
235
The Theory of the Rentier State and Constitutional Monarchy in the Middle East
255
Notes
269
Bibliography
315
Index
335
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1999)

Michael Herb is Assistant Professor in the Political Science department at Georgia State University.

Bibliographic information