A Journey Into Cornwall, Through the Counties of Southampton, Wilts, Dorset, Somerset & Devon:: Interspersed with Remarks, Moral, Historical, Literary, and Political (Google eBook)

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H. Sharpe, 1799 - England - 364 pages
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Page 129 - Go ! fair example of untainted youth, Of modest wisdom, and pacific truth : Composed in sufferings, and in joy sedate, Good without noise, without pretension great. Just of thy word, in every thought sincere, Who knew no wish but what the world might hear : Of softest manners, unaffected mind, Lover of peace, and friend of human kind : Go, live ! for heaven's eternal year is thine, Go, and exalt thy mortal to divine.
Page 80 - Rural confusion ! On the grassy bank Some ruminating lie ; while others stand Half in the flood, and often bending sip The circling surface.
Page 35 - Here sleeps in peace a Hampshire Grenadier, Who caught his death by drinking cold small beer. Soldiers, be wise from his untimely fall. And when you're hot, drink strong or none at all.
Page 168 - There, interspersed in lawns and opening glades, Thin trees arise that shun each other's shades. Here in full light the russet plains extend : There wrapt in clouds the bluish hills ascend. Ev'n the wild heath displays her purple dyes, And 'midst the desert fruitful fields arise, That, crown'd with tufted trees and springing corn, Like verdant isles, the sable waste adorn.
Page 211 - With dim mortality. It is not air That from a thousand lungs reeks back to thine, Sated with exhalations rank and fell, The spoil of dunghills, and the putrid thaw Of nature...
Page 174 - ... of nature, all the works of art, all the labours of men are reduced to nothing. All that we admired and adored before as great...
Page 131 - Heavens ! what a goodly prospect spreads around, Of hills, and dales, and woods, and lawns, and spires, And glittering towns, and gilded streams, till all The stretching landscape into smoke decays...
Page 324 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew-tree's shade Where heaves the turf in many a mouldering heap, Each in his narrow cell for ever laid, The rude Forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 266 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains never meant to draw, The George and Garter...
Page 175 - Rome, the great city, the empress of the world, whose domination and superstition, ancient and modern, make a great part of the history of this earth, what is become of her now? She laid her foundations deep, and her palaces were strong and sumptuous : she glorified herself, and lived deliciously, and said in her heart, I sit a queen, and shall see no sorrow.

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