Northanger Abbey (Google eBook)

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Richard Bentley & Son, 1882 - English literature
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Page 22 - And what are you reading, Miss ?" "Oh, it is only a novel," replies the young lady while she lays down her book with affected indifference or momentary shame. "It is only Cecilia or Camilla or Belinda...
Page 412 - Harville was beginning to say, when a slight noise called their attention to Captain Wentworth's hitherto perfectly quiet division of the room. It was nothing more than that his pen had fallen down ; but Anne was startled at finding him nearer than she had supposed, and half inclined to suspect that the pen had only fallen because he had been occupied by them, striving to catch sounds, which yet she did not think he could have caught. "Have you finished your letter?" said Captain Harville. "Not quite,...
Page 261 - Soon, however, she began to reason with herself, and try to be feeling less. Eight years, almost eight years had passed, since all had been given up. How absurd to be resuming the agitation which such an interval had banished into distance and indistinctness ! What might not eight years do ? Events of every description, changes, alienations, removals, all, all must be comprised in it...
Page 22 - England, or of the man who collects and publishes in a volume some dozen lines of Milton, Pope, and Prior, with a paper from the Spectator, and a chapter from Sterne...
Page 348 - Mr. Elliot was rational, discreet, polished, but he was not open. There was never any burst of feeling, any warmth of indignation or delight, at the evil or good of others.
Page 234 - How eloquent could Anne Elliot have been, how eloquent, at least, were her wishes, on the side of early warm attachment, and a cheerful confidence in futurity, against that over-anxious caution which seems to insult exertion and distrust Providence ! She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.
Page 13 - How are your various dresses to be remembered, and the particular state of your complexion, and curl of your hair to be described in all their diversities, without having constant recourse to a journal? My dear madam, I am not so ignorant of young ladies...
Page 260 - Wentworth's, a bow, a courtesy passed ; she heard his voice ; he talked to Mary, said all that was right, said something to the Miss Musgroves, enough to mark an easy footing ; the room seemed full, full of persons and voices, but a few minutes ended it. Charles shewed himself at the window, all was ready, their visitor had bowed and was gone, the Miss Musgroves were gone too, suddenly resolving to walk to the end of the village with the sportsmen ; the room was cleared, and Anne might finish her...
Page 22 - Now, had the same young lady been engaged with a volume of the Spectator, instead of such a work, how proudly would she have produced the book, and told its name ! though the chances must be against her being occupied by any part of that voluminous publication, of which either the matter or manner would not disgust a young person of taste ; the substance of its...
Page 423 - I have been thinking over the past, and trying to judge of the right and wrong I mean with regard to myself; and I must believe that I was right, much as I suffered from it that I was perfectly right in being guided by the friend whom you will love better than you do now. To me, she was in the place of a parent. Do not mistake me, however. I am not saying that she did not err in her service. It was, perhaps, one of those cases in which advice is good or bad only as the event decides and for...

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