Stuttering and Cluttering: Frameworks for Understanding and Treatment

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Taylor & Francis, Feb 28, 2008 - Psychology - 456 pages
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Stuttering and Cluttering provides a comprehensive overview of both theoretical and treatment aspects of disorders of fluency: stuttering (also known as stammering) and the lesser-known cluttering.

The book demonstrates how treatment strategies relate to the various theories as to why stuttering and cluttering arise, and how they develop. Uniquely, it outlines the major approaches to treatment alongside alternative methods, including drug treatment and recent auditory feedback procedures. Part one looks at different perspectives on causation and development, emphasizing that in many cases these apparently different approaches are inextricably intertwined. Part two covers the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of stuttering and cluttering. In addition to chapters on established approaches, there are sections on alternative therapies, including drug therapy, and auditory feedback, together with a chapter on counselling. Reference is made to a number of established treatment programs, but the focus is on the more detailed description of specific landmark approaches. These provide a framework from which the reader may not only understand others’ treatment procedures, but also a perspective from which they can develop their own.

Offering a clear, accessible and comprehensive account of both the theoretical underpinning of stammering therapy and its practical implications, the book will be of interest to speech language therapy students, as well as qualified therapists, psychologists, and to those who stutter and clutter.

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About the author (2008)

David Ward is Director of the Speech Research Laboratory at The University of Reading, and a specialist fluency clinician within the NHS. He qualified as a speech language therapist in 1987, and received an MA in Linguistics and Phonetics and a PhD in motor control and stuttering. He has lectured extensively on disorders of fluency, and is involved in research into both theoretical and clinical aspects of stuttering and cluttering.

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