AN APOLOGY FOR THE COMMON ENGLISH BIBLE; AND A REVIEW OF THE EXTRAORDINARY CHANGES MADE IN IT BY MANAGERS OF THE AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY (Google eBook)

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Page 67 - Who will not say that the uncommon beauty and marvellous English of the Protestant Bible is not one of the great strongholds of heresy in this country? It lives on the ear, like a music that can never be forgotten, like the sound of church bells, which the convert hardly knows how he can forego. Its felicities often seem to be almost things rather than mere words. It is part of the national mind, and the anchor of national seriousness The memory of the dead passes into it.
Page 29 - For it is written, Rejoice, thou barren that bearest not; Break forth and cry, thou that travailest not: for the desolate hath many more children than she which hath an husband.
Page 50 - These words spake his parents, because they feared the Jews : for the Jews had agreed already, that if any man did confess that he was Christ, he should be put out of the synagogue.
Page 1 - Neither do men put new wine into old bottles : else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish : but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved.
Page 67 - The potent traditions of childhood are stereotyped in its verses. The power of all the griefs and trials of a man is hidden beneath its words. It is the representative of his best moments, and all that there has been about him of soft and gentle, and pure and penitent and good, speaks to him for ever out of his English Bible. . . . . It is his sacred thing, which doubt has never dimmed, and controversy never soiled. In the length and breadth of the land there is not a Protestant with one spark of...
Page 61 - With me in dreadful harmony they join, And weave with bloody hands the tissue of thy line. ii. 1. "Weave the warp, and weave the woof, The winding sheet of Edward's race. Give ample room, and verge enough The characters of hell to trace. Mark the year, and mark the night, When Severn shall re-echo with affright The shrieks of death, through Berkley's roof that ring. Shrieks of an agonizing king!
Page 68 - Give us grace seriously to lay to heart the great dangers we are in by our unhappy divisions. Take away all hatred and prejudice, and whatsoever else may hinder us from Godly Union and Concord: that, as there is but one Body, and one Spirit, and one Hope of our Calling, one LORD, one Faith, one Baptism, one GOD and FATHER of us all, so we may...
Page 32 - I charge you, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, By the roes, and by the hinds of the field, That ye stir not up, nor awake my love, till he please.
Page 7 - ... we desire you would be pleased to take notice of the principals and body of our Company, as those who esteem it our honor to call the Church of England, from whence we rise, our dear mother ; and cannot part from our native country, where she specially resideth, without much sadness of heart and many tears in our eyes...
Page 7 - For myself, thus I believe with my heart before God, and profess with my tongue, and have before the world, that I have one and the same faith, hope, spirit, baptism, and Lord, which I had in the Church of England, and none other ; that I esteem so many in that church of what state, or order...

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