Dialect Notes, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
American Dialect Society, 1904 - English language
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 223 - Work; it pleased God to stir up the heart of one Mr. Harvard (a godly Gentleman and a lover of Learning, there living amongst us) to give the one halfe of his Estate (it being in all about ^1700) towards the erecting of a Colledge, and all his Library...
Page 93 - Edifice is very faire and comely within and without, having in it a spacious Hall; (where they daily meet at Commons, Lectures and Exercises), and a large Library with some Bookes to it...
Page 109 - The building is beautiful and commodious, being first modelled by Sir Christopher Wren, adapted to the nature of the country by the gentlemen there...
Page 216 - Committee of the Court of General Sessions of the Peace for the County of Suffolk...
Page 98 - There are three colledges built in Cambridge, one with timber at the charge of Mr. Harvard and bears his name ; a...
Page 213 - Enemy ; they were entertain'd at the Stadthouse, and made their Appearance also among the Ladies on the Assembly Night, where they danced the Scalping Dance with all its Horrors, and almost terrified the Company out of...
Page 115 - I found out that such words as pa tikkele (particular), stcebel (stable), fens (fence), were not Norse but mutilated English words. I had often wondered that poleit, trubbel, soppereter, were so much like the English words polite, trouble, separator. So common is this practice of borrowing that no English word is refused admittance into this vocabulary provided it can stand the treatment it is apt to get. Some words are, indeed, used without any appreciable difference in pronunciation, but more generally...
Page 223 - English witnessed a native ceremony "held in commemoration of the Plentiful Harvest of Corn they had reaped the Summer before. . . . These revels were carried on in a House made for that purpose, it being done round, with white benches of fine Canes joining along the wall; and a place for the door being left, which is so low, that a man must stoop very much to enter therein. This Edifice...
Page 278 - the investigation of the spoken English of the United States and Canada, and incidentally of other non-aboriginal dialects spoken in the same countries".
Page 218 - New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the government of the counties of Newcastle, Kent, and Sussex, upon Delaware...

Bibliographic information