The Constitutional History of England: Since the Accession of George the Third, 1760-1860, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Crosby and Nichols, 1863 - Constitutional history
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Page 83 - They parted - ne'er to meet again! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining They stood aloof, the scars remaining, Like cliffs, which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between; But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly do away, I ween, The marks of that which once hath been.
Page 26 - ... patriots and courtiers, king's friends and republicans; whigs and tories; treacherous friends and open enemies ; that it was indeed a very curious show, but utterly unsafe to touch, and unsure to stand on.
Page 213 - The punishing of wits enhances their authority," saith the Viscount St. Albans, "and a forbidden writing is thought to be a certain spark of truth that flies up in the faces of them who seek to tread it out.
Page 552 - But how much nobler will be the Sovereign's boast, when he shall have it to say, that he found law dear, and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich .left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence...
Page 498 - a complete reform of the legislature, founded on the principles of civil, political, and religious liberty.
Page 76 - Bill implies merely a careful review of institutions, civil and ecclesiastical, undertaken in a friendly temper, combining, with the firm maintenance of established rights, the correction of proved abuses, and the redress of real grievances, in that case I can, for myself and colleagues, undertake to act in such a spirit, and with such intentions.
Page 168 - ... in direct opposition to the declared sense of a great majority of the nation, and they should be put in force with all their rigorous provisions, if his opinion were asked by the people as to their obedience, he should tell them, that it was no longer a question of moral obligation and duty, but of prudence.
Page 556 - The discretion of a judge is the law of tyrants : it is always unknown ; it is different in different men ; it is casual, and depends upon constitution, temper, and passion. In the best, it is oftentimes caprice ; in the worst it is every vice, folly, and passion, to which human nature is liable.'*- Lord Camden.
Page 103 - Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.
Page 216 - If all mankind, minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.

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