Medicine Transformed: Health, Disease and Society in Europe 1800-1930

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Deborah Brunton
Manchester University Press, Sep 4, 2004 - History - 414 pages
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During the nineteenth century medicine underwent a radical transformation. In 1800, the body was still understood in terms of humors and fluids, and a wide range of individuals provided medical care. Institutions were marginal to the medical enterprise, and governments took almost no part in providing medical services. By 1930 a new modern medicine had begun to emerge across Europe. New understandings of the body opened up surgery and treatments, and hospitals became centers for care, research and training. In Medicine Transformed, original essays by established scholars in the social history of medicine explore these developments and examine topics such as the military and colonial medicine, the role of women and access to care. The essays provide an accessible introduction to the subject, setting nineteenth and early twentieth-century medicine in its political, cultural, intellectual and economic contexts.

Medicine transformed is complemented by a companion volume of primary and secondary readings: Health, disease and society in Europe, 1800-1930: A source book.
  

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Contents

The localization of disease
1
The changing role of the hospital 18001900
31
The emergence of modern surgery
61
The rise of laboratory medicine
92
The emergence of a modern profession?
119
doctors and nurses 18501920
151
public health 18301880
180
Colonial and imperial medicine
211
public health 18801930
239
The fortunes of eugenics
266
The rise of the asylum in Britain
298
Medicine in war
331
Access to health care 18801930
364
Glossary
395
Index
401
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About the author (2004)

Deborah Brunton is Lecturer in the History of Medicine at The Open University.

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