Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

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UNC Press Books, Feb 1, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 452 pages
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From the 1920s through the 1950s Maxwell Anderson was one of the most important playwrights in America. His thirty-three produced plays make him a leader among these playwrights of America's most creative era in the theater, and a number of his plays have
  

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Contents

BECOMING A PLAYWRIGHT 19121925
1
ACHIEVEMENT AND RECOGNITION 19261940
27
ACHIEVEMENT AND CONTROVERSY 19411953
107
ACHIEVEMENT AND PEACE 19541958
265
APPENDIXES
291
3 The Eve of St Mark ACT II SCENE 4
297
4 ACCEPTANCE SPEECH FOR THE BROTHERHOOD AWARD TO Lost in the Stars FROM THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CHRISTIANS A...
298
5 ANDERSON MEMOIR
301
THREE GENERATIONS OF MAXWELL ANDERSONS FAMILY
319
PRINCIPAL CORRESPONDENTS
322
OMITTED LETTERS
330
INDEX
345
Copyright

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Page xxi - knew he had to try" to dramatize it.' He wrote to Alan Paton: I hope I can convey to you, at so great a distance, something of the emotion with which I read 'Cry, the Beloved Country' and which many Americans must feel now as they read it.
Page xliv - If we are going to have a great theatre in this country somebody has to write verse, even if it is written badly.

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About the author (2001)

Laurence G. Avery, editor of the award-winning A Southern Life: Letters of Paul Green, 1916-1981, is professor of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

After some years as a teacher and a journalist, Maxwell Anderson turned to drama in 1923, achieving his first success with What Price Glory? in 1924, a World War I comedy cowritten with Laurence Stallings. During his long and successful career as a dramatist, Anderson produced historical dramas, patriotic plays, musicals, fantasies, and a thriller. Perhaps his best piece is Winterset (1935), a play Inspired by the Sacco and Vanzetti case. Anderson's first play was a verse drama. Beginning with Elizabeth the Queen (1940), his most famous historical drama, he employed for many years an irregular blank verse, typical of his attempt to bring high seriousness to the Broadway stage. Critics have not been enthusiastic about Anderson's work, and his plays are seldom revived today, but in his heyday-especially the 1930s-his plays repeatedly succeeded in the commercial theater. Anderson won the Pulitzer Prize for drama for Both Your Houses (1933) and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Winterset (1935) and High Tor (1937).

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