A Short History of the English People (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1874 - Great Britain - 847 pages
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User Review  - Cyss - LibraryThing

a Description of the The battle of Marston Moor is found on page 552. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

Probably the biggest contributor to the standard popular knowledge of English history in its day. Read full review

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Page 208 - But is there no quick recreation granted? King. Ay, that there is : our court, you know, is haunted With a refined traveller of Spain; A man in all the world's new fashion planted, That hath a mint of phrases in his brain : One, whom the music of his own vain tongue Doth ravish, like enchanting harmony...
Page 340 - Sir, the State, in choosing men to serve it, takes no notice of their opinions ; if they be willing faithfully to serve it, that satisfies.
Page 254 - Sometimes, with secure delight, The upland hamlets will invite, When the merry bells ring round, And the jocund rebecks sound To many a youth and many a maid Dancing in the chequered shade...
Page 312 - I must tell you, there are two kings and two kingdoms in Scotland. There is King James, the head of the commonwealth, and there is Christ Jesus the King, and his kingdom the Kirk, whose subject King James the Sixth is, and of whose kingdom he is not a king, nor a lord, nor a head, but a member.
Page 393 - For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and to the next age.
Page 339 - I came one morning into the House well clad, and perceived a gentleman speaking, whom I knew not, very ordinarily apparelled, for it was a plain cloth suit, which seemed to have been made by an ill country tailor. His linen was plain, and' not very clean ; and I remember a speck or two of blood upon his little band, which was not much larger than his collar. His hat was without a hatband ; his stature was of a good size ; his sword stuck close to his side, his countenance swollen and reddish, his...
Page 279 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and. inheritance of the subjects of England...
Page 288 - ... and that your Majesty would also vouchsafe to declare, that the awards, doings, and proceedings to the prejudice of your people, in any of the premises, shall not be drawn hereafter into consequence or example : and that your Majesty would be also graciously pleased, for the further comfort and safety of your people, to declare your royal will and pleasure, that in the things aforesaid all your officers and ministers shall serve you, according to the laws and statutes of this realm, as they tender...
Page 557 - If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I would never lay down my arms never, never, never...
Page 399 - ... as now they are ; with other things appertaining to what hath been called the New Philosophy, which from the times of Galileo at Florence, and Sir Francis Bacon (Lord Verulam) in England, hath been much cultivated in Italy, France, Germany, and other parts abroad, as well as with us in England.

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