The Drama: Its Laws and Its Technique (Google eBook)

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Allyn and Bacon, 1898 - Drama - 181 pages
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Page 63 - Comedy is an imitation of the common errors of our life, which he representeth in the most ridiculous and scornful sort that may be, so as it is impossible that any beholder can be content to be such a one.
Page 89 - Thy life hath had some smatch of honor in it. Hold then my sword, and turn away thy face, While I do run upon it. Wilt thou, Strato ? Stra, Give me your hand first. Fare you well, my lord. Bru. Farewell, good Strato. Caesar, now be still : I killed not thee with half so good a will.
Page 56 - The passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Page 170 - As when some one peculiar quality Doth so possess a man, that it doth draw All his affects, his spirits, and his powers, In their confluctions, all to run one way, This may be truly said to be a humour.
Page 71 - To be suspected ; fram'd to make women false. The Moor is of a free and open nature, That thinks men honest, that but seem to be so ; And will as tenderly be led by the nose, As asses are. I have't ; it is engender'd : Hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth to the world's light.
Page 10 - A whole is that which has a beginning, a middle, and an end. A beginning is that which does not itself follow anything by causal necessity, but after which something naturally is or comes to be. An end, on the contrary, is that which itself naturally follows some other thing, either by necessity, or as a rule, but has nothing following it. A middle is that which follows something as some other thing follows it.
Page 10 - Unity of plot does not, as some persons think, consist in the unity of the hero. For infinitely various are the incidents in one man's life which cannot be reduced to unity; and so, too, there are many actions of one man out of which we cannot make one action.
Page 173 - Aristodemus did not hear the beginning of the discourse, and he was only half awake, but the chief thing which he remembered, was Socrates insisting to the other two that the genius of comedy was the same as that of tragedy, and that the writer of tragedy ought to be a writer of comedy also.
Page 168 - Men's future upon earth does not attract it; their honesty and shapeliness in the present does; and whenever they wax out of proportion, overblown, affected, pretentious, bombastical, hypocritical, pedantic, fantastically delicate; whenever it sees them selfdeceived or hoodwinked, given to run riot in idolatries, drifting into vanities, congregating in absurdities, planning shortsightedly, plotting dementedly...
Page 64 - Well, I will scourge those apes, And to these courteous eyes oppose a mirror, As large as is the stage whereon we act ; Where they shall see the time's deformity Anatomized in every nerve and sinew, With constant courage, and contempt of fear.

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