Political Dissent in Democratic Athens: Intellectual Critics of Popular Rule

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Princeton University Press, Nov 12, 2001 - History - 417 pages
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How and why did the Western tradition of political theorizing arise in Athens during the late fifth and fourth centuries B.C.? By interweaving intellectual history with political philosophy and literary analysis, Josiah Ober argues that the tradition originated in a high-stakes debate about democracy. Since elite Greek intellectuals tended to assume that ordinary men were incapable of ruling themselves, the longevity and resilience of Athenian popular rule presented a problem: how to explain the apparent success of a regime "irrationally" based on the inherent wisdom and practical efficacy of decisions made by non-elite citizens? The problem became acute after two oligarchic coups d' tat in the late fifth century B.C. The generosity and statesmanship that democrats showed after regaining political power contrasted starkly with the oligarchs' violence and corruption. Since it was no longer self-evident that "better men" meant "better government," critics of democracy sought new arguments to explain the relationship among politics, ethics, and morality.

Ober offers fresh readings of the political works of Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle, among others, by placing them in the context of a competitive community of dissident writers. These thinkers struggled against both democratic ideology and intellectual rivals to articulate the best and most influential criticism of popular rule. The competitive Athenian environment stimulated a century of brilliant literary and conceptual innovation. Through Ober's re-creation of an ancient intellectual milieu, early Western political thought emerges not just as a "footnote to Plato," but as a dissident commentary on the first Western democracy.

  

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Contents

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Page vi - We may add that when we are dealing with words that also are a constituent act, like the Constitution of the United States, we must realize that they have called into life a being the development of which could not have been foreseen completely by the most gifted of its begetters.
Page i - College through a foundation established by his many friends in honor of Charles Beebe Martin, for forty-five years a teacher of classical literature and classical art at Oberlin. John Peradotto, Man in the Middle Voice: Name and Narration in the Odyssey Martha C. Nussbaum, The Therapy of Desire: Theory and Practice in Hellenistic Ethics Josiah Ober, Political Dissent in Democratic Athens: Intellectual Critics of Popular Rule Anne Carson, Economy of the Unlost (Reading Simonides of Keos with Paul...
Page i - Peradotto, Man in the middle voice. Name and narration in the Odyssey (Princeton 1990) and MA Katz, Penelope's renown.
Page i - The Martin Classical Lectures are delivered annually at Oberlin College on a foundation established by his many friends in honor of Charles Beebe Martin, for forty-five years a teacher of classical literature and classical art in Oberlin.

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About the author (2001)

Josiah Ober is the David Magie Professor of Ancient History in the Department of Classics at Princeton University. His books include "The Athenian Revolution, Mass and Elite in Democratic Athens", and "Demokratia "(edited with Charles Hedrick). All three books are available from Princeton.

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