An African Centered Response to Ruby Payne's Poverty Theory

Front Cover
African American Images, 2006 - Education - 174 pages
2 Reviews
This challenge to influential educator Ruby Payne's theories about the impact of class differences and economics on teaching and learning puts forward other factors as better predictors of student performance. Pointing to success stories in schools that serve low-income students, this refutation of Payne's popular teacher-training program asserts that teacher expectations, time on task, and the principal's leadership are the main factors in determining educational outcomes at a school. Abandoning Payne's framework of teacher-student income disparities, racial makeup, and per-pupil expenditure, this critical analysis asserts the human component as the most powerful tool for improving education in failing schools.

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Review: An African Centered Response to Ruby Payne's Poverty Theory

User Review  - Brittani Jordan - Goodreads

Very good read that gives solutions to better schools, better teachers, better students, and starting to eradicate poverty. Read full review

Review: An African Centered Response to Ruby Payne's Poverty Theory

User Review  - Katie Ulrich - Goodreads

I found this book to be biased at times. Additionally, the charts and tables were not valid due to the date of their origination. However, it lent great perspective to strategies for successful academic engagement of African American Students living in poverty. Read full review

Contents

Ruby Paynes Position
1
White Poverty
21
Economic Empowerment
47
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Dr. Jawanza Kunjufu has been an educational consultant to school districts for more than 30 years and is the author of Black Students, Middle Class Teachers, Countering the Conspiracy to Destroy Black Boys, and Keeping Black Boys Out of Special Education. He lives in Chicago.

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