In the beginning ...was the command line

Front Cover
Avon Books, 1999 - Computers - 151 pages
38 Reviews

This is "the Word" -- one man's word, certainly -- about the art (and artifice) of the state of our computer-centric existence. And considering that the "one man" is Neal Stephenson, "the hacker Hemingway" (Newsweek) -- acclaimed novelist, pragmatist, seer, nerd-friendly philosopher, and nationally bestselling author of groundbreaking literary works (Snow Crash, Cryptonomicon, etc., etc.) -- the word is well worth hearing. Mostly well-reasoned examination and partial rant, Stephenson's In the Beginning... was the Command Line is a thoughtful, irreverent, hilarious treatise on the cyber-culture past and present; on operating system tyrannies and downloaded popular revolutions; on the Internet, Disney World, Big Bangs, not to mention the meaning of life itself.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Lyndatrue - LibraryThing

It's a fun book. Neal writes from the perspective of someone dropped into the operating systems world right about the time that some things were vanishing, and others were just coming into their own ... Read full review

Review: In the Beginning...Was the Command Line

User Review  - Erika - Goodreads

This essay is outdated, misses the point on a lot of things, and is a bit too dogmatic - everyone must have the same needs and abilities and priorities as I do, so why isn't everyone making the same ... Read full review

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About the author (1999)

Neal Stephenson, the science fiction author, was born on October 31, 1959 in Maryland. He graduated from Boston University in 1981 with a B.A. in Geography with a minor in physics. His first novel, The Big U, was published in 1984. It received little attention and stayed out of print until Stephenson allowed it to be reprinted in 2001. His second novel was Zodiac: The Eco-Thriller was published in 1988, but it was his novel Snow Crash (1992) that brought him popularity. It fused memetics, computer viruses, and other high-tech themes with Sumerian mythology. Neal Stephenson has won several awards: Hugo for Best Novel for The Diamond Age (1996), the Arthur C. Clark for Best Novel for Quicksilver (2004), and the Prometheus Award for Best Novel for The System of the World (2005). He recently completed the The Baroque Cycle Trilogy, a series of historical novels. It consists of eight books and was originally published in three volumes. He currently resides in Seattle, Washington with his family. Stephenson also writes under the pseudonym Stephen Bury.

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