The Apocrypha: An American Translation

Front Cover
Edgar Johnson Goodspeed, Moses Hadas
Vintage Books, 1938 - Religion - 493 pages
5 Reviews
The Apocrypha consists of the books that are found in the Greek version of the Jewish Bible--the Septuagint, the earliest complete version of the Bible we possess--but that were not included in the final, canonical version of the Hebrew Bible. For this reason, they were called “Apocrypha,” the hidden or secret books, and while they formed part of the original King James version of 1611, they are no longer included in modern Bibles. Yet they include such important works as The First Book of Maccabees, the Wisdom of Solomon, Ecclesiasticus, and the stories of Susanna, Tobit, and Judith, and other works of great importance for the history of the Jews in the period between the rebuilding of the Temple and the time of Jesus, and thus for the background of the New Testament. These works have also had a remarkable impact on writers and artists. Beyond this, they are often as powerful as anything in the canonical Bible.

The translation into contemporary English is by Edgar J. Goodspeed.
  

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A Must Have

User Review  - Nazarene2000 - Christianbook.com

This is a must have book. In fact, you should read the apocrypha because it is used historically. Without a knowledge of it, you will lack analytic abilities toward literature in the western world ... Read full review

Review: Apocrypha

User Review  - Guy David - Goodreads

I read about all of this that I could stand for the present. I do not think that I am in the right frame of mind to admire any of the beauty that may be hidden here. Read full review

Contents

THE F IRST Boon or Esmms I
39
Boox or Tonrr 107
131
Boox or Esr1u2 165
221
Tris BOOK or BARUCH 329
347
Sons or ma Tmuzr Cmnnasu 355
373
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About the author (1938)

AESCHYLUS: A complete fifth-century Athenian, he was the creator of her proudest artistic achievement, tragedy. By using more than one actor he changed the form of plays from recited poetry to true dramatic dialogue, thereby making possible the sweeping grandeur of his great trilogy, THE ORESTEIA.

SOPHOCLES: The most popular tragedian of the Golden Age, he expanded the scope of classic drama by his technical innovations and lyric intensity, leaving the world such masterpieces as ANTIGONE and OEDIPUS THE KING, the play Aristotle called the perfect model of Greek tragedy.

EURIPIDES: A prolific author, Euripides wrote some one hundred plays. In contrast to his contemporaries, he brought an exciting-and, to the Greeks, a stunning-realism to the "pure and noble" form of tragedy. His influence altered drama forever, and he is regarded today as the originator of modern dramatic sensibility.

ARISTOPHANES: The most famous comic playwright of ancient Greece, he wrote what are now the only extant representative of Greek Old Comedy. His three outstanding characteristics-gross obscenity, exquisite lyricism, and a serious concern for decency and morality-may seem a strange combination to the modern reader. Aristophanes is still regarded by modern audiences as a master of risqué wit and brilliant comic invention.

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