Books 1-12 (Google eBook)

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Fields, Osgood, 1870
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Page 1 - O Goddess ! sing the wrath of Peleus' son, Achilles ; sing the deadly wrath that brought Woes numberless upon the Greeks, and swept To Hades many a valiant soul, and gave Their limbs a prey to dogs and birds of air, — For so had Jove appointed, — from the time When the two chiefs, Atrides, king of men, And great Achilles, parted first as foes.
Page 203 - Andromache Pressed to his side meanwhile, and, all in tears, Clung to his hand, and, thus beginning, said: — "Too brave! thy valor yet will cause thy death. Thou hast no pity on thy tender child, Nor me, unhappy one, who soon must be Thy widow. All the Greeks will rush on thee To take thy life. A happier lot were mine, If I must lose thee, to go down to earth, For I shall have no hope when thou art gone — Nothing but sorrow. Father have I none, And no dear mother. Great Achilles slew My father...
Page 88 - Small blame is theirs, if both the Trojan knights And brazen-mailed Achaians have endured So long so many evils for the sake Of that one woman.
Page 206 - And eyeing with affright the horse-hair plume That grimly nodded from the lofty crest. At this both parents in their fondness laughed; And hastily the mighty Hector took The helmet from his brow and laid it down Gleaming upon the ground, and, having kissed His darling son and tossed him up in play, Prayed thus to Jove and all the gods of heaven...
Page 207 - Received him, weeping as she smiled. The chief Beheld, and, moved with tender pity, smoothed Her forehead gently with his hand and said: "Sorrow not thus, beloved one, for me. No living man can send me to the shades Before my time; no man of woman born, Coward or brave, can shun his destiny. But go thou home, and tend thy labors there — The web, the distaff — and command thy maids To speed the work. The cares of war pertain To all men born in Troy, and most to me.
Page 206 - So speaking, to the arms of his dear spouse He gave the boy; she on her fragrant breast Received him, weeping as she smiled. The chief Beheld, and, moved with tender pity, smoothed Her forehead gently with his hand and said: "Sorrow not thus, beloved one, for me. No living man can send me to the shades Before my time; no man of woman born, Coward or brave, can shun his destiny.
Page 204 - Then answered Hector, great in war : " All this I bear in mind, dear wife ; but I should stand Ashamed before the men and long-robed dames Of Troy, were I to keep aloof and shun The conflict, coward-like.
Page 205 - But not the sorrows of the Trojan race, Nor those of Hecuba herself, nor those Of royal Priam, nor the woes that wait My brothers many and brave, — who all at last. Slain by the pitiless foe, shall lie in dust,— Grieve me so much as thine, when some mailed Greek Shall lead thee weeping hence, and take from thee Thy day of freedom. Thou in Argos then Shalt, at another's bidding, ply the loom. And from the fountain of Messeis draw Water, or from the Hypereian spring.
Page 206 - O Jupiter and all ye deities, Vouchsafe that this my son may yet become Among the Trojans eminent like me, And nobly rule in Ilium. May they say, 'This man is greater than his father was!' When they behold him from the battlefield Bring back the bloody spoil of the slain foe, That so his mother may be glad at heart.
Page 264 - So, high in hope, they sat the whole night through In warlike lines, and many watch-fires blazed, As when in heaven the stars look brightly forth Round the clear-shining moon, while not a breeze Stirs in the depths of air, and all the stars Are seen, and gladness fills the shepherd's heart, So many fires in sight of Ilium blazed, Lit by the sons of Troy, between the ships And eddying Xanthus : on the plain there shone A thousand ; fifty warriors by each fire Sat in its light.

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