Col. Clipsham's Calendar (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. S. Smith & Company, 1895 - 51 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 20 - ... but his speech was not in the least commonplace, and it ended with a very serious pledge as to the duty they would all do to their country. It was received rapturously yes, wildly. Indeed, as the reader will understand, it was better received than it would have been by the graduates whom Clipham thought he was addressing. Every one of these good fellows was pleased that one of the most accomplished men of letters in Tamworth spoke to him as an equal with equals. They had only too much of...
Page 31 - Clipsham compromised with himself. He would go to Colorado because he wanted to and his cold was so bad. But he saw on the calendar that on Monday night there was a meeting of the Friends of Good Government at the Mechanics' Hall. He knew who called this meeting, and that it was in the right interest. John Fisher and all the rest had signed the call. He would go to that meeting. That would show which side he was on. He would not go on the noon train ; he would wait until the evening train, which...
Page 27 - Tamworth harbor. These Ojibwas had long since gone where other Ojibwas, I fear, are going. But the fund remained, as funds will, to curse the descendants of the trustees. And the only way which had been devised to use up the annual interest was to have the trustees dine together, with such of their friends as wished to meet them, after they had chosen themselves again into office at their annual meeting. At the Chautauquan dinner, accordingly, Clipsham went rather carefully into a discussion of the...
Page 34 - Why he was there the leaders wondered, but they supposed, in their low way, that he had quarreled with John Fisher and his set, and had come over to them to see what they would give him. The truth was, as the reader sees, that he had come to a meeting which was one day earlier than the meeting which he had meant to come to. Clipsham himself did not hear the man who spoke, and did not know what they were shouting at. But when another man came to lead him to the platform he knew what that meant, and...
Page 26 - ... the Chautauquan Literary Circle. That is to say, he thought he was speaking to a large company of people who, in the midst of every sort of daily occupation, read regularly in a systematic course. So in fact he was. And the carriage-builders liked his speech all the better that he made no pretense, as they said any other lawyer would have done, to a knowledge of their business. He said nothing about varnish, or the strength of ash, of which he knew nothing, and he did not once allude to the hub...
Page 13 - ... would, and the result was the same. Gertrude was called by her mother, before she had any chance to go back again, and was made ready for a tennis party at Mrs. Fisher's. And now it is that, strictly speaking, this story begins. George Clipsham came home to dress for dinner. He stopped a moment, and took down the cyclopaedia to look at the account of the Battle of Bennington. For he had been turning over a speech which he was to make at a Grand Army gathering, and he remembered that Plunkett's...
Page 26 - ... the sugar. Four days went on in this way, with four different dinners. Nobody told Clipsham he was all wrong, because nobody knew. On the other hand, everybody thought he was all right, and said he had never made such good speeches in his life. The next night he really went to the Carriage-Builders' dinner. But he thought he was at the annual meeting of the Chautauquan Literary Circle. That is to say, he thought he was speaking to a large company of people who, in the midst of every sort of daily...
Page 20 - ... work which educated men can render in any community. What he had been saying to the German he now said aloud. There is the secret of a good speech. He spoke to the men before him as if they were all scholars, all men of conscience, and all leaders in the villages or towns where they lived. He told some good stories, he made some good jokes, but his speech was not in the least commonplace, and it ended with a very serious pledge as to the duty they would all do to their country. It was received...
Page 44 - After a moment's delay he was admitted, and a very charming lady came forward to meet him. Clipsham bowed, and said she was very kind to be so informal and to permit him to be, but he was a traveler, and had but one night in Chicago ; and then he was presented to Elinor, and I think the whole thing was pretty much finished then, as far as he was concerned and so would you, if you knew Elinor Clipsham as well as I do. Then there was a little inquiry about Dr. Jones. But that did not...
Page 39 - ENLIGHTENED! A LIVELY CAUCUS ! A CITIZEN'S PROTEST! LIGHT IN DARK PLACES! And the public soon knew that, for once, the little coterie which had '' run " Tamworth for some years had been told the truth by one modest, quiet gentleman, who had no ax to grind, and no ring behind him. That man was Clipsham. While he was doing the mountains and canons of Colorado, without the slightest suspicion of it himself, events were making him the most popular man in the State. So soon as there was a chance, the...

Bibliographic information