A grammar of the pure and mixed East Indian dialects. With a refutation of the assertions of sir W. Jones respecting the Shamscrit alphabet (Google eBook)

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1801
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Page 63 - A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted; A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up; A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance...
Page 30 - If I love, if thou love;" when it is barely expressed without any limitation of person or number, it is called the infinitive, as, " to love;" and when it is expressed in a form in which it may be joined to a noun as its quality or accident, partaking thereby of the nature of an adjective, it is called the participle, as,
Page vii - European public, without delay, solicited the Governor-General — Sir John Shore, (now Lord Teignmouth) for a regular licence, who granted it to me without hesitation. Thus fortified by patronage, and anxious to exhibit, I set about building a commodious Theatre, on a plan of my own, in Dom-Tollah, (DomeLane) in the centre of Calcutta ; and in the mean while I employed my Linguist to procure native actors of both sexes, — in three months both Theatre and Actors were ready for representation of...
Page xvii - Afiatick literature. This is the fimpleft element of articulation, or firft vocal found, concerning which enough has been faid : the word America begins and ends with it; and its proper fymbol therefore is A; though it may be often very conveniently exprefled by E, for reafons, which I fhall prefently offer.
Page vii - Linguist to procure native actors of both sexes, — in three months both Theatre and Actors were ready for representation of The Disguise, which I accordingly produced to the Public in the Bengal language, on the 27th of November, 1795 ; and again on the 21st, of March, 1796.
Page ix - Our English alphabet and orthography are disgracefully and almost ridiculously imperfect ; and it would be impossible to express either Indian, Persian, or Arabian words in Roman characters, as we are absurdly taught to pronounce them.
Page vi - ... perused the work very attentively ; and I then had the opportunity of observing those sentences, which appeared to them most pleasing, and which most excited emotion ; and I presume I do not much flatter myself, when I affirm that by this translation the spirit of both the comic and serious scenes were much heightened, and which would in vain be imitated by any European, who did not possess the advantage of such an instructor as I bad the extraordinary good fortune to procure.
Page 61 - Thebeil quality that a man can have, is to be civil and obliging, to the moft uncivil and difobügíng people.
Page xix - Delusion. 1 Restrain, deluded mortal, thy thirst of acquiring wealth ; excite an aversion from it in thy body, understanding, and inclination : with the riches which thou acquirest by thine own actions, with these satisfy thy soul. 2. Who is thy wife, who thy son ; how extremely wonderful is even this world ; whose creature thou also art ; whence thou earnest ; meditate on this, o brother, and again on this.
Page xix - ... and inclination : with the riches which thou acquirest by thine own actions, with these satisfy thy soul. 2. Who is thy wife, who thy son ; how extremely wonderful is even this world ; whose creature thou also art ; whence thou eamest ; meditate on this, o brother, and again on this. 3. Make no boast of opulence, attendants, youth ; all these time snatches away in the twinkling of an eye : checking all this illusion like Maya, set thy heart on the foot of Brahme, speedily gaining knowledge of...

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