Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856: Dec. 5. 1796-March 3, 1803: 1796-1803 (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1857 - Law
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Page 423 - In prosecutions for the publication of papers, investigating the official conduct of officers, or men in a public capacity, or where the matter published is proper for public information, the truth thereof may be given in evidence; and, in all indictments for libels, the jury shall have a right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.
Page 334 - An act further to suspend the commercial intercourse between the United States and France and the dependencies thereof...
Page 12 - Such is the amiable and interesting system of government (and such are some of the abuses to which it may be exposed) which the people of America have exhibited to the admiration and anxiety of the wise and virtuous of all nations for eight years under the administration of a citizen who, by a long course of great actions, regulated by prudence, justice, temperance, and fortitude, conducting a people inspired with the same virtues and animated with the same ardent patriotism and love of liberty to...
Page 15 - To secure respect to a neutral flag, requires a naval force, organized and ready to vindicate it from insult or aggression. This may even prevent the necessity of going to war...
Page 423 - That printing presses shall be free to every person who undertakes to examine the proceedings of the General Assembly, or any branch of government ; and no law shall ever be made to restrain the right thereof.
Page 327 - The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and equity arising under the constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority...
Page 16 - Amongst the motives to such an institution, the assimilation of the principles, opinions and manners of our countrymen, by the common education of a portion of our youth from every quarter, well deserves attention. The more homogeneous our citizens can be made in these particulars, the greater will be our prospect of permanent union ; and a primary object of such a national institution should be, the education of our youth in the science of government.
Page 135 - Directory had determined not to receive another minister plenipotentiary from the United States until after the redress of grievances demanded of the American Government, and which the French Republic had a right to expect from it.
Page 414 - The attributes and decorations of royalty could have only served to eclipse the majesty of those virtues which made him, from being a modest citizen, a more resplendent luminary. Misfortune, had he lived, could hereafter have sullied his glory only with those superficial minds, who, believing that characters and actions are marked by success alone, rarely deserve to enjoy it. Malice could never blast his honor, and envy made him a singular exception to her universal rule.
Page 119 - The speech of the President discloses sentiments more alarming than the refusal of a minister, because more dangerous to our independence and union ; and, at the same time, studiously marked with indignities towards the government of the United States.

References from web pages

Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856: "From ...
Abridgment of the Debates of Congress, from 1789 to 1856: "From Gales and Seatons' Annals of Congress; from Their Register of Debates; and from the Official ...
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