Illegal Drugs: A Complete Guide to Their History, Chemistry, Use and Abuse

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Penguin, 2004 - Medical - 456 pages
10 Reviews

Does Ecstasy cause brain damage? Why is crack more addictive than cocaine? What questions regarding drugs are legal to ask in a job interview? When does marijuana possession carry a greater prison sentence than murder?

Illegal Drugs is the first comprehensive reference to offer timely, pertinent information on every drug currently prohibited by law in the United States.  It includes their histories, chemical properties and effects, medical uses and recreational abuses, and associated health problems, as well as addiction and treatment information.

Additional survey chapters discuss general and historical information on illegal drug use, the effect of drugs on the brain, the war on drugs, drugs in the workplace, the economy and culture of illegal drugs, and information on thirty-three psychoactive drugs that are legal in the United States, from caffeine, alcohol and tobacco to betel nuts and kava kava.

  

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Review: Illegal Drugs

User Review  - Derekbarrientos - Goodreads

Reading Illegal drugs educated me much in my knowledge of drugs and what they do. The author wrote this book to educate people about illegal drugs, and to me, he did a great job in doing so. At first ... Read full review

Review: Illegal Drugs

User Review  - Chris Horsley - Goodreads

I feel that the author did a very good job of accomplishing his goal to educate the readers about drugs. When I first read this book, I expected to be reading another boring book on drugs, but it was ... Read full review

Contents

I
vii
II
3
III
17
V
55
VI
87
VII
107
IX
127
X
163
XIX
263
XXI
277
XXII
285
XXIII
299
XXIV
307
XXV
319
XXVII
337
XXVIII
351

XI
195
XIII
203
XIV
223
XVI
231
XVIII
239
XXIX
359
XXXI
385
XXXII
393
XXXIII
413
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

 Dr. Paul Gahlinger has been involved in drug research since 1984 and is a professor of medicine at the University of Utah.  He is a certified substance abuse medical review officer, an FAA aviation medical examiner, and a consultant for NASA at the Kennedy Space Center, and a passionate spokesperson on drug issues.

Bibliographic information