Jewish Law in Gentile Churches: Halakhah and the Beginning of Christian Public Ethics

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A&C Black, Nov 20, 2000 - Religion - 314 pages
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Why did the Gentile church keep Old Testament commandments about sex and idolatry, but disregard many others, like those about food or ritual purity? If there were any binding norms, what made them so, and on what basis were they articulated?In this important study, Markus Bockmuehl approaches such questions by examining the halakhic (Jewish legal) rationale behind the ethics of Jesus, Paul and the early Christians. He offers fresh and often unexpected answers based on careful biblical and historical study. His arguments have far-reaching implications not only for the study of the New Testament, but more broadly for the relationship between Christianity and Judaism.
  

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A bit of a technical book Read full review

Contents

Matthews Divorce Texts in the Light of PreRabbinic
17
Jesus and the
23
James Israel and Antioch
49
Natural Law in Second Temple Judaism
87
Natural Law in the New Testament?
113
The Noachide Commandments and New Testament
145
From Luke
177
Jewish and Christian Public Ethics in the Early Roman
229
Bibliography
241
List of First Publications
281
Index of Modern Authors
303
Index of Subjects
309
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About the author (2000)

Dr Markus Bockmuehl is Professor of Biblical and Early Christian Studies at the University of St Andrews, UK.

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