Voice of the Old Wolf: Lucullus Virgil McWhorter and the Nez Perce Indians

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Washington State University Press, Jan 1, 1996 - History - 198 pages
2 Reviews
Lucullus V. McWhorter (1860-1944) devoted much of his life to preserving the history of the Nez Perce and Yakama Indians of the Pacific Northwest's interior plateau region. Author of the classic Western histories, Yellow Wolf (1940) and Hear Me, My Chiefs! (1952), McWhorter held a unique role as Nez Perce tribal historian and gatherer of tradition lore from both treaty and non-treaty bands. In Voice of the Old Wolf, Steve Evans helps to fill a significant gap in Nez Perce history, focusing on the 1880s to the 1940s, a period often neglected by the many historians of the 1877 war.

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Review: Voice Of The Old Wolf: Lucullus Virgil Mc Whorter And The Nez Perce Indians

User Review  - Denise DeRocher - Goodreads

A great tribute to the genre of Nez Perce history. Steve was a professor and a friend of mine - this was his PhD dissertation, and one of the best I have read! Read full review

Review: Voice Of The Old Wolf: Lucullus Virgil Mc Whorter And The Nez Perce Indians

User Review  - Goodreads

A great tribute to the genre of Nez Perce history. Steve was a professor and a friend of mine - this was his PhD dissertation, and one of the best I have read! Read full review

Contents

A Vision for Revision
19
Spirits of Wallowa and Salmon River
33
History Postponed and Postponed Again
51
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Steven Ross Evans, (Ph. D., history, Washington State University), taught history for thirty-three years at Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho, before retiring in 2001. He also led a parallel life in the construction trade working out of the Alaska Laborer's Union, Local #341, Anchorage, and retired from that in 1991. For the last eleven years he has been working with Allen Pinkham researching and writing on the Nez Perce Indians and the Lewis and Clark expedition. His wife, Connie, is a member of the Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho and they have three children and five grandchildren.

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