An Inspector Calls: Play in Three Acts

Front Cover
Dramatists Play Service, Inc., 1945 - Drama - 68 pages
14 Reviews
The action of the play occurs in an English industrial city, where a young girl commits suicide and an eminently respectable British family is subject to a routine inquiry in connection with the death. An inspector calls to interrogate the family, and during the course of his questioning, all members of the group are implicated lightly or deeply in the girl's undoing. The family, closely knit and friendly at the beginning of the evening, is shown up as selfish, self-centered or cowardly, its good humor turning to acid, and good fellowship to dislike, before the evening is over. The surprising revelation, however, is in the inspector - who turns out to be no copper at all but a mysterious individual with full knowledge of everyone's connection with the suicide. After the false inspector has been shown up, and it is discovered that no suicide had been recorded, an actual copper shows, and a last-minute suicide is reported, which ties in mysteriously with the foregoing.
  

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Review: An Inspector Calls

User Review  - Katie Huxtable - Goodreads

Read this in class as part of my GCSE Literature Exam. As it is a play and I am also a drama freak I was eager to volunteer to read in, and was picked to read in as Sheila. I found myself thoroughly ... Read full review

Review: An Inspector Calls

User Review  - Elle May - Goodreads

In terms of a book that highlights relevant social ideologies and opinions there is no better book. Priestley forces the reader to analyse perceptions of gender, age, class and social responsibility ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
II
28
III
48
Copyright

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About the author (1945)

English novelist, playwright, and critic J. B. Priestley was born in Bradford in Yorkshire, the setting for many of his stories, and was educated at Cambridge University. Although he first established a reputation with critical writings such as The English Comic Characters (1925), The English Novel (1927), and English Humor (1928), it is for his novels and plays that he is best known. Priestley was, like John Galsworthy and Somerset Maugham, a novelist only partially committed to his playwriting. Yet he became the dominant literary figure in the London West End during the 1930s, as he attempted to make realistically rendered domestic conversation the vehicle for a mature study of personality and emotion. Philosophical theories about time, Socialist dogmatism (often erupting into sermons), and a taste for dramatic expressionism may be said to have finally deflected him from his goal. Priestley's experimental bent nevertheless yielded, among his more than 25 plays, a number of striking theatrical situations---the soliloquies of Ever since Paradise, the reviewed life in Johnson over Jordan (1939), the replay of an ill-fated conversational turn in Dangerous Corner (his most successful play, 1934), and the supernatural visitation in An Inspector Calls (his acknowledged masterpiece, 1946).

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