Sociocultural and Historical Contexts of African American English

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Sonja L. Lanehart
John Benjamins Publishing, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 371 pages
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This volume, based on presentations at a 1998 state of the art conference at the University of Georgia, critically examines African American English (AAE) socially, culturally, historically, and educationally. It explores the relationship between AAE and other varieties of English (namely Southern White Vernaculars, Gullah, and Caribbean English creoles), language use in the African American community (e.g., Hip Hop, women's language, and directness), and application of our knowledge about AAE to issues in education (e.g., improving overall academic success). To its credit (since most books avoid the issue), the volume also seeks to define the term 'AAE' and challenge researchers to address the complexity of defining a language and its speakers. The volume collectively tries to help readers better understand language use in the African American community and how that understanding benefits all who value language variation and the knowledge such study brings to our society.
  

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Contents

What is African American English?
21
The relationship between African American Vernacular English
53
The relationship between the evolution
93
New evidence on 19thcentury
129
Language Use in the African American Community
169
Grammar and language ideology
187
Talking that talk
211
Directness in the use of African American English
239
African American English and Education
261
Using calland
281
Applying our knowledge of African American English
299
Applying linguistic knowledge of African American English
319
Index
363
Copyright

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