Colloquial and Literary Latin (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Eleanor Dickey, Anna Chahoud
Cambridge University Press, Jul 22, 2010 - Foreign Language Study
0 Reviews
What is colloquial Latin? What can we learn about it from Roman literature, and how does an understanding of colloquial Latin enhance our appreciation of literature? This book sets out to answer such questions, beginning with examinations of how the term 'colloquial' has been used by linguists and by classicists (and how its Latin equivalents were used by the Romans) and continuing with exciting new research on colloquial language in a wide range of Latin authors. Each chapter is written by a leading expert in the relevant area, and the material presented includes new editions of several texts. The Introduction presents the first account in English of developments in the study of colloquial Latin over the last century, and throughout the book findings are presented in clear, lucid, and jargon-free language, making a major scholarly debate accessible to a broad range of students and non-specialists.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
Roman authors on colloquial language
12
Idioms and literariness in classical literary criticism
42
Preliminary conclusions
65
Possessive pronouns in Plautus
71
Greeting and farewell expressions as evidence for colloquial
100
Colloquial and literary language in early Roman tragedy
127
The fragments of Catos Origines
154
divine discourse in Virgils Aeneid
266
Petronius linguistic resources
281
Parenthetical remarks in the Silvae
292
Colloquial Latin in Martials epigrams
318
Current and ancient colloquial in Gellius
331
Forerunners of Romance mente adverbs in Latin prose
339
the influence of sources on
357
The tale of Frodeberts tail
376

Hyperbaton and register in Cicero
163
Notes on the language of Marcus Caelius Rufus
186
Syntactic colloquialism in Lucretius
203
style grammar and philosophy
229
The style of the Bellum Hispaniense and the evolution
243
the literary uses of the quotidian in Horace
255
Colloquial Latin in the Insular Latin scholastic colloquia?
406
Conversations in Bedes Historia Ecclesiastica
419
References
441
Subject index
473
Index locorum
489
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Eleanor Dickey is Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Exeter. She is the author of numerous books and articles on the Greek and Latin languages and linguistics, including Ancient Greek Scholarship: A Guide to Finding, Reading, and Understanding Scholia, Commentaries, Lexica, and Grammatical Treatises, from their Beginnings to the Byzantine Period (2007); Latin Forms of Address: From Plautus to Apuleius (2002) and Greek Forms of Address: From Herodotus to Lucian (1996).

Anna Chahoud is Professor of Latin at Trinity College Dublin. She is a member of the editorial board of The Bryn Mawr Classical Review, and the author of Lucilii Reliquiarum Concordantiae (1998).

Bibliographic information