Music Theory For Dummies

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Feb 25, 2011 - Music - 360 pages
22 Reviews
Many people grimace at the sound of music theory. It can conjure up bad memories of grade school music classes, rattle the brains of college students, and make self-taught musicians feel self-defeated. Music Theory may seem tedious and unnecessary, especially since not many people can read music.

Luckily, Music Theory for Dummies shows you the fun and easy way to understanding the concepts needed to compose, deconstruct, and comprehend music. This helpful guide will give you a great grasp of:

  • Note value and counting notes
  • Treble and bass clefs
  • Time signatures and measures
  • Naturalizing the rhythm
  • Tempo and dynamic
  • Tone, color, and harmonics
  • Half steps and whole steps
  • Harmonic and melodic intervals
  • Key signatures and circles of fifths
  • Scales, chords, and their progressions
  • Elements of form
  • Music theoryís fascinating history

This friendly guide not only explores these concepts, it provides examples of music to compliment them so you can hear how they sound firsthand. With a bonus CD that demonstrates these ideas with musical excerpts on guitar and piano, this hands-on resource will prove to you that music theory is as enjoyable as it is useful. Donít get discouraged by the seemingly complicated written structure. With Music Theory for Dummies, understanding music has never been easier!

Note: CD-ROM/DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of eBook file.

  

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Review: Music Theory for Dummies

User Review  - Ljubomir - Goodreads

The book is good in the sense that it did help me understand music a bit better, but that is it. Its target group is not at all so wide as the description claims. It would be useful mostly to aspiring ... Read full review

Review: Music Theory for Dummies

User Review  - Steve - Goodreads

I am using this book for reference. I read it all the way thru and now look at it when I want to clarify a point. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The Part of Tens 249
4
Rhythm Keeping the Beat
7
Counting Out Notes
15
Giving It a Rest
31
Time Signatures
41
Naturalizing the Beat
57
Tempo and Dynamics
65
The Major and Minor Scales
147
Building Chords
161
Chord Progressions
193
Cadence
207
Form How Its Shaped
215
Classical Forms
229
Popular Forms
241
Six Most Frequently Asked Questions About Music Theory
251

Melody The Part You Hum
77
Instrument Tone and Color
93
Half Steps Whole Steps Sharps and Flats
99
Harmony Fleshing It Out
105
Intervals
107
Key Signatures and the Circle of Fifths
131
Nine Music Theorists You Should Know About
261
How to Use the CD
269
Chord Chart
277
Glossary
315
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Michael Pilhofer teaches music theory and percussion at McNally Smith College of Music in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he serves as department head of the Ensembles Department. He has worked as a professional musician for more than 18 years and has toured and recorded with Joe Lovano, Marian McPartland, Kenny Wheeler, Dave Holland, Bill Holman, Wycliffe Gordon, Peter Erskine, and Gene Bertoncini.

Holly Day has written about music for numerous publications internationally, including Computer Music Journal, ROCKRGRL, Music Alive!, Guitar One, Brutarian Magazine, Interface Technology, and Mixdown magazine. Over the past couple of decades, her writing has received an Isaac Asimov Award, a National Magazine Award, and two Midwest Writerís Grants.† Her previous books include The Insiderís Guide to the Twin Cities (3rd, 4th, and 5th Editions), Shakira, and Behind the Orange Curtain: A History of Orange County Punk Rock.

Bibliographic information