The External Control of Organizations: A Resource Dependence Perspective

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Stanford University Press, 2003 - Business & Economics - 300 pages
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Among the most widely cited books in the social sciences, The External Control of Organizations has long been required reading for any student of organization studies. The book, reissued on its 25th anniversary as part of the Stanford Business Classics series, includes a new preface written by Jeffrey Pfeffer, which examines the legacy of this influential work in current research and its relationship to other theories.

The External Control of Organizations explores how external constraints affect organizations and provides insights for designing and managing organizations to mitigate these constraints. All organizations are dependent on the environment for their survival. As the authors contend, "it is the fact of the organization's dependence on the environment that makes the external constraint and control of organizational behavior both possible and almost inevitable." Organizations can either try to change their environments through political means or form interorganizational relationships to control or absorb uncertainty. This seminal book established the resource dependence approach that has informed so many other important organization theories.

  

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Contents

Organization and Social Context Defined
23
Social Control of Organizations
39
The Organizational Environment and How It Is Known
62
Adaptation and Avoidance
92
Controlling
113
Establishing Collective
143
Controlling Interdependence
188
A Mechanism for Environmental Effects
225
The Design and Management of Externally Controlled Organizations
257
Index
289
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. His recent publications include The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Companies Turn Knowledge into Action and Hidden Value: How Great Companies Achieve Extraordinary Results with Ordinary People. Gerald R. Salancik was the D. B. Kirr Professor of Organization at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Carnegie Mellon University.

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