The Cambridge History of the English Language, Volume 6

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Richard M. Hogg, Norman Francis Blake, Roger Lass, John Algeo, R. W. Burchfield
Cambridge University Press, 1992 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 662 pages
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This volume traces the history of English in North America during the past 400 years. Sixteen leading authorities in the field consider how the vocabulary (both standard and slang), grammar, spelling, and usage in both the standard language and regional and social dialects have evolved, and examine the relationship of and interaction between British and American En glish. Separate chapters deal with African-American English, Canadian English and Newfoundland English and the volume also includes suggestions for further reading, a glossary of linguistic terms, and an extensive bibliography.
  

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Review: The Cambridge History of the English Language: Volume 1

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What a vast and astonishing work this series is. "Practically unreadable" my old professor would probably say, meaning it is less a series that most people (most!) will sit down with just to read ... Read full review

Contents

BRITISH AND AMERICAN CONTINUITY
59
CONTACT WITH OTHER LANGUAGES
154
AMERICANISMS Frederic G Cassidj
184
SLANG Jonathan E Lighter
219
DIALECTS UePederson
253
AFRICANAMERICAN ENGLISH
291
GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE Ronald R Butters
325
SPELLING Richard L enesky
340
CANADIAN ENGLISH laurel Brinton
422
NEWFOUNDLAND ENGLISH William J Kirwin
441
AMERICAN ENGLISH ABROAD Richard W Bailey
456
Glossary of linguistic terms
497
Bibliography
516
Index
568
Copyright

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Page 518 - THE VERBALIST : A Manual devoted to Brief Discussions of the Right and the Wrong Use of Words, and to some other matters of Interest to those who would Speak and Write with Propriety, including a Treatise on Punctuation. By ALFRED AYRES.

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About the author (1992)

Richard Hogg is Smith Professor of Language and Medieval English at the University of Manchester.

John Algeo is Professor Emeritus at the University of Georgia.

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