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Books Books 1 - 10 of 32 on And I cannot but wonder at the strange presumption of some men, that dare so audaciously....  
" And I cannot but wonder at the strange presumption of some men, that dare so audaciously... "
Ancient critical essays upon English poets and posy - Page 219
by George Gascoigne, William Webbe, Sir John Harington, James I (King of England), Thomas Campion, Francis Meres, Edmund Bolton, Samuel Daniel, Edmund Spenser, Gabriel Harvey - 1815
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The Poetical Works of Mr. Samuel Daniel ...: To which is Prefix'd, Memoirs ...

Samuel Daniel - 1718
...openly upon a Singularity ; when our own accuftomed Phrafe, fet in the due Place, would exprefs u* more familiarly and to better Delight, than all this idle Affectation of Antiquity or Novelty can ever do. And I cannot but wonder at the ftrangc Prefumption of fome Men, that dare fo audacioufly...
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Wells of English

Isaac Bassett Choate - English literature - 1891 - 310 pages
...to the language. The whole essay is of itself a fine example of English in the time of Elizabeth. " And I cannot but wonder at the strange presumption of some men, that dare so audaciously to introduce any whatsoever foreign words, be they never so strange ; and of themselves- as it were,...
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English Writers: An Attempt Towards a History of English Literature, Volume 10

Henry Morley, William Hall Griffin - English literature - 1893
...openly upon a singularity ; when our own accustomed phrase, set in the due place, would express us more familiarly and to better delight than all this idle affectation of antiquity or novelty can ever do. And I cannot but wonder at the strange presumption of some men, that dare so audaciously...
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English writers: an attempt towards a history of English literature, Volume 10

Henry Morley, William Hall Griffin - English literature - 1893
...works. delight than nil this idle affectation of antiquity or novelty can ever do. And I cannot bul wonder at the strange presumption of some men, that dare so audaciously to introduce any whatsoever foreign words, be they never so strange ; and of themselves, as it were,...
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Literary Pamphlets Chiefly Relating to Poetry from Sidney to Byron ...

Ernest Rhys - English poetry - 1897
...expresse vs more familiarly and to better delight then all this idle affectation of antiquitie or noueltie can euer do. And I cannot but wonder at the strange...audaciously aduenture to introduce any whatsoeuer forren words, be they neuer so strange ; 1 and of themselues, as it were, without a Parliament, without...
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Literary Pamphlets Chiefly Relating to Poetry from Sidney to Byron, Volume 1

Ernest Rhys - English literature - 1897
...another kinde of speech out of the course of our vsual practise, openly vpon a singularitie ; when owre accustomed phrase, set in the due place, would expresse vs more familiarly and to better delight then all this idle affectation of antiquitie or noueltie can euer do. And I cannot but wonder at the...
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Literary Pamphlets Chiefly Relating to Poetry from Sidney to Byron ...

Ernest Rhys - English poetry - 1897
...another kinde of speech out of the course of our vsual practise, openly vpon a singularitie ; when owre accustomed phrase, set in the due place, would expresse vs more familiarly and to better delight then all this idle affectation of antiquitie or noueltie can euer do. And I cannot but wonder at the...
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Elizabethan critical essays, Volume 2

George Gregory Smith - Criticism - 1904
...course of our vsuall practise, displacing our wordes, or inuenting new, onely vpon a singularitie, when our owne accustomed phrase, set in the due place, would expresse vs more a familiarly and to better delight than all this idle affectation of antiquitie or noueltie can euer...
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A literary history of the English people from the renaissance to the civil ...

Jean Jules Jusserand - English literature - 1906
...us."2 We ought not to be, writes Daniel, " both unkinde and unnaturall to our owne native language. ... I cannot but wonder at the strange presumption of some men, that dare so audaciously adventure to introduce any whatsoever forraine wordes, be they never so strange, and of themselves...
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English Epic and Heroic Poetry, Volume 1

William Macneile Dixon - English poetry - 1912 - 339 pages
...openly upon a singularity ; when our own accustomed phrase, set in the due place, would express us more familiarly and to better delight than all this idle affectation of antiquity or novelty can ever do." But this very zeal for a disciplined poesy, though it bore its own fruit, making...
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