The Golden Trade; Or, A Discovery of the River Gambra, and the Golden Trade of the Aethiopians (Google eBook)

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Speight and Walpole, 1623 - Africa, West - 209 pages
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Page 112 - I made answer, We were a people, who did not deale in any such commodities, neither did wee buy or sell one another, or any that had our owne shapes...
Page xiii - Gambra, and the Golden Trade of the Aethiopians. ALso, The Commerce with a great blacke Merchant^ called Buckor Sano, and his report of the houses covered with Gold, and other strange observations for the good of our owne countrey ; Set downe as they were collected in travelling, part of the yeares, 1620.
Page 58 - Guard, passing through an open house, where stands his chaire empty, unlawfull for any but himselfe to sit in, by which hangs his drummes, the onely instruments of warre which we see amongst them, neither are these drummes without dayly imployment, for this is their continuall custome every night after it seemes they have filled their bellies, they repaire to this Court of Guard, making fires both in the middle of the house, and in the open yard, about which they doe continue drumming, hooping, singing,...
Page 112 - ... they carried downe into the countrey, where they fetcht all their salt, and that they were solde there to white men, who earnestly desired them, especially such young women, as hee had brought for us: we answered, They were another kinde of people different from us, but for our part, if they had no other commodities, we would returne againe...
Page 35 - Molatoes, between blacke and white, but the most part as blacke, as the naturall inhabitants: they are scattered some two or three dwellers in a place, and are all married, or rather keepe with them the countrey blacke-women, of whom they beget children, howbeit they have amongst them neither Church, nor Friar, nor any other religious order.
Page v - New reprinted for the First Time. Edited by Charles G. Kingsley, with woodcut ornamentation based on West African designs by R. Morton Nance.
Page 42 - Their women amongst them are streight, upright, and excellently well bodied, having very good features, with a long blacke haire much more loose than the blacke women have, wherewith they attire themselves very neatly, but in their apparell they goe clothed and weare the same habite, the blacke...
Page 90 - ... to receive the multitude, and nearest unto the grave, and sitting downe in a round ring, in the middle came foorth a Mary-bucke. who betwixt saying and singing, did rehearse as it were certaine verses, in the praise and remembrance of him departed, which it should seeme was done extempore; or provided for that assembly, because upon divers words or sentences hee spake, the people would make such sodaine exultations, by clapping their hands, and every one running in, to give and present unto him,...
Page 37 - ... sell one thing for another as the whole country doth, still reserving carefully the use of the Portingall tongue and, with a kinde of affectionate zeale, the name of Christians...
Page 133 - There is without doubt, no people on the earth more naturally affected to the sound of musicke than these people; which the principall persons do hold as an ornament of their state, so as when wee come to see them their musicke will seldome be wanting; wherein they...

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