Gender Trials: Emotional Lives in Contemporary Law Firms (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, 1995 - Law - 256 pages
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This engaging ethnography examines the gendered nature of today's large corporate law firms. Although increasing numbers of women have become lawyers in the past decade, Jennifer Pierce discovers that the double standards and sexist attitudes of legal bureaucracies are a continuing problem for women lawyers and paralegals. Working as a paralegal, Pierce did ethnographic research in two law offices, and her depiction of the legal world is quite unlike the glamorized version seen on television. Pierce tellingly portrays the dilemma that female attorneys face: a woman using tough, aggressive tactics the ideal combative litigator is often regarded as brash or even obnoxious by her male colleagues. Yet any lack of toughness would mark her as ineffective. Women paralegals also face a double bind in corporate law firms. While lawyers depend on paralegals for important work, they also expect these women for most paralegals are women to nurture them and affirm their superior status in the office hierarchy. Paralegals who mother their bosses experience increasing personal exploitation, while those who do not face criticism and professional sanction. Male paralegals, Pierce finds, do not encounter the same difficulties that female paralegals do. Pierce argues that this gendered division of labor benefits men politically, economically, and personally. However, she finds that women lawyers and paralegals develop creative strategies for resisting and disrupting the male-dominated status quo. Her lively narrative and well-argued analysis will be welcomed by anyone interested in today's gender politics and business culture.
  

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Contents

Gendering Occupations and Emotions in Law Firms
1
The Gendered Organizational Structure of Large Law Firms
26
Rambo Litigators Emotional Labor in a Male Dominated Job
50
Mothering Paralegals Emotional Labor in a Feminized Occupation
83
Women and Men as Litigators Gender Differences on the Job
103
Gendering Consent and Resistance in Paralegal Work
143
Conclusion
176
Articulating the Self in Field Research
189
Lawyer Jokes
215
Notes
217
References
231
Index
253
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About the author (1995)

Jennifer L. Pierce is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota.

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