The Psychology of Humor: An Integrative Approach (Google eBook)

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Academic Press, Jul 27, 2010 - Psychology - 464 pages
2 Reviews
Research on humor is carried out in a number of areas in psychology, including the cognitive (What makes something funny?), developmental (when do we develop a sense of humor?), and social (how is humor used in social interactions?) Although there is enough interest in the area to have spawned several societies, the literature is dispersed in a number of primary journals, with little in the way of integration of the material into a book.

Dr. Martin is one of the best known researchers in the area, and his research goes across subdisciplines in psychology to be of wide appeal. This is a singly authored monograph that provides in one source, a summary of information researchers might wish to know about research into the psychology of humor. The material is scholarly, but the presentation of the material is suitable for people unfamiliar with the subject-making the book suitable for use for advanced undergraduate and graduate level courses on the psychology of humor-which have not had a textbook source.

2007 AATH Book Award for Humor/Laughter Research category!

*Up-to-date coverage of research on humor and laughter in every area of psychology
*Research findings are integrated into a coherent conceptual framework
*Includes recent brain imaging studies, evolutionary models, and animal research
*Draws on contributions from sociology, linguistics, neuroscience, and anthropology
*Provides an overview of theories of humor and early research
*Explores applications of humor in psychotherapy, education, and the workplace
*Points out interesting topics for further research and promising research methodologies
*Written in a scholarly yet easily accessible style
*2007 AATH Book Award for Humor/Laughter Research category
  

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its cool

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This textbook provides an excellent introduction to not only psychological but also linguistic, philosophical, anthropological, and other approaches to humor. Its bibliography is also very good, though there are a couple of gaps here and there. Recommended.

Contents

CHAPTER 7
191
SelfReport Measures of Sense of Humor Dimensions
205
Sense of Humor as an Ability
216
Personality Characteristics of Professional Humorists
223
CHAPTER 8
229
Humor and Cognitive Development
238
Humor as Emotional Coping
247
Humor and Aging
263

Conclusion
81
Humor Incongruity and Schemas
85
Psychological Approaches to the Study of Schemas in Humor
92
Effects of Humor on Cognition
101
Humor as Cognitive Play
108
Humor as Social Interaction
114
Social Aspects of Laughter
128
Humor and Persuasion
136
Humor and Intimate Relationships
143
Conclusion
150
The Nature of Laughter
154
Autonomic and Visceral Concomitants of Mirth
162
Pathological Laughter
169
The Neural Basis of Cognitive Processes in Humor
176
Evolutionary Theories of Humor and Laughter
185
CHAPTER 9
269
Humor Stress and Coping
282
Interpersonal Aspects of Humor in Mental Health
297
Conclusion
305
Humor and Physical Health
309
Humor and Immunity
317
Humor and Pain
323
Humor and Longevity
329
CHAPTER
335
Humor in the Workplace
360
General Discussion
369
SUBJECT INDEX
421
AUTHOR INDEX
431
Copyright

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Page 44 - I may therefore conclude, that the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from a sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly...
Page 35 - Like wit and the comic, humor has in it a liberating element. But it has also something fine and elevating, which is lacking in the other two ways of deriving pleasure from intellectual activity. Obviously, what is fine about it is the triumph of narcissism, the ego's victorious assertion of its own invulnerability.
Page 35 - Freud elevates humor to a noble, heroic status: [Humour] is fine . . . elevating . . . the triumph of narcissism, the ego's victorious assertion of its own invulnerability. It refuses to be hurt ... or to be compelled to suffer. It insists that it is impervious to wounds dealt by the outside world, in fact that these are merely occasions for affording it pleasure.

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