Masterful Women: Slaveholding Widows from the American Revolution Through the Civil War

Front Cover
Univ of North Carolina Press, 2004 - Social Science - 281 pages
0 Reviews
Many early-nineteenth-century slaveholders considered themselves "masters" not only over slaves, but also over the institutions of marriage and family. According to many historians, the privilege of mastery was reserved for white males. But as many as one
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Masterful women: slaveholding widows from the American Revolution through the Civil War

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

How did slaveholding widows in the American South exhibit mastery, a decidedly masculine trait, over slaves and households while maintaining their status as ladies? This is the question explored by ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Broken Reeds
15
The Management of Negroes
35
The Strongest Ties That Bind Poor Mortals
61
A Very Public Road
83
The Leading Men and Women
103
Worried in Body and Vexed in Heart
131
What Will Become of Us
159
Epilogue
193
Notes
199
Bibliography
247
Index
267
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 262 - Society for the Relief of the Widows and Orphans of the Clergy of the Protestant Episcopal Church in South Carolina.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Kirsten E. Wood is assistant professor of history at Florida International University, where she is also affiliated with the women's studies and African/New World studies programs.

Bibliographic information