Medicine and the Ethics of Care (Google eBook)

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Diana Fritz Cates, Paul Lauritzen
Georgetown University Press, Mar 1, 2002 - Medical - 368 pages
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In these essays, a diverse group of ethicists draw insights from both religious and feminist scholarship in order to propose creative new approaches to the ethics of medical care. While traditional ethics emphasizes rules, justice, and fairness, the contributors to this volume embrace an "ethics of care," which regards emotional engagement in the lives of others as basic to discerning what we ought to do on their behalf.

The essays reflect on the three related themes: community, narrative, and emotion. They argue for the need to understand patients and caregivers alike as moral agents who are embedded in multiple communities, who seek to attain or promote healing partly through the medium of storytelling, and who do so by cultivating good emotional habits. A thought-provoking contribution to a field that has long been dominated by an ethics of principle, "Medicine and the Ethics of Care" will appeal to scholars and students who want to move beyond the constraints of that traditional approach.

  

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Contents

Are Care and Justice Distinct Virtues?
3
Care and Justice as Moral Values for Nurses in an Era of Managed Care
41
The Need for Integrating Care Ethics into Hospital Care A Case Study
69
CARE AND EMOTION
103
The Emotions of Care in Health Care
105
The Psychology of Emotion and the Ethics of Care
141
Caring for Girls and Women Who Are Considering Abortion Rethinking Informed Consent
162
CARE AND NARRATIVE
205
God and an Ethic of Care On Being Immanuel
207
Communities of Care of Trust and of Healing
234
Doubled in the Darkest Mirror Practice and the Retold Narrative of the Jewish Burial Society
270
AIDS in East Tennessee Medicine and Morals as Local Activities
297
INDEX
325
Copyright

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Page xv - In this conception, the moral problem arises from conflicting responsibilities rather than from competing rights and requires for its resolution a mode of thinking that is contextual and narrative rather than formal and abstract. This conception of morality as concerned with the activity of care centers moral development around the understanding of responsibility and relationships, just as the conception of morality as fairness ties moral development to the understanding of rights and rules.
Page xv - Gilligan observes, the outline of a moral conception different from that described by Freud, Piaget, or Kohlberg begins to emerge and informs a different description of development. In this conception, the moral problem arises from conflicting responsibilities rather than from competing rights and requires for its resolution a mode of thinking that is contextual and narrative rather than formal and abstract.

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About the author (2002)

Diana Fritz Cates, an associate professor of ethics in the School of Religion at the University of Iowa, is author of Choosing to Feel: Virtue, Friendship, and Compassion for Friends.

Paul Lauritzen is a professor and the chair of the Department of Religious Studies and the director of the Program in Applied Ethics at John Carroll University. His books include Cloning and the Future of Human Embryo Research.

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