Mastery of Words: A Course in Spelling (Google eBook)

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Iroquois publishing Company, 1920 - Spellers - 117 pages
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Page 122 - So nigh is grandeur to our dust, So near is God to man, When Duty whispers low, Thou must, The youth replies, I can...
Page 109 - Yet, ere we part, one lesson I can leave you For every day. Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever ; Do noble things, not dream them, all day long : And so make life, death, and that vast for-ever One grand, sweet song.
Page 30 - And ere three shrill notes the pipe uttered, You heard as if an army muttered: And the muttering grew to a grumbling; And the grumbling grew to a mighty rumbling, And out of the houses the rats came tumbling. Great rats, small rats, lean rats, brawny rats, Brown rats, black rats, gray rats, tawny rats, Grave old plodders, gay young friskers, Fathers, mothers, uncles, cousins, Cocking tails and pricking whiskers, Families by tens and dozens, Brothers, sisters, husbands, wives— Followed the Piper...
Page 83 - ALL things bright and beautiful, All creatures great and small, All things wise and wonderful, The Lord God made them all.
Page 55 - THE WIND IN A FROLIC. The wind one morning sprang up from sleep, Saying, " Now for a frolic ! Now for a leap ! Now for a madcap galloping chase ! I'll make a commotion in every place ! " So it swept with a bustle right through a great town, Creaking the signs and scattering down Shutters, and whisking with merciless squalls, Old women's bonnets and gingerbread stalls. There never was heard a much lustier shout, As the apples and oranges tumbled...
Page 87 - WHICHEVER way the wind doth blow, Some heart is glad to have it so; Then blow it east or blow it west, The wind that blows, that wind is best.
Page 118 - ... arm in arm, how pleasant here to pace ; Or, o'er the stern reclining, watch below The foaming wake far widening as we go. On stormy nights when wild north-westers rave, How proud a thing to fight with wind and wave ! The dripping sailor on the reeling mast Exults to bear, and scorns to wish it past.
Page 102 - Howe'er it be, it seems to me 'Tis only noble to be good. Kind hearts are more than coronets, And simple faith than Norman blood.
Page 115 - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Page 57 - That are yellow with ripening grain. They find in the thick waving grasses Where the scarlet-lipped strawberry grows; They gather the earliest snowdrops And the first crimson buds of the rose.

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