Education in Colorado: 1861-1885 : a Brief History of the Early Educational Interests of Colorado, Together with the History of the State Teachers' Association, and Short Sketches of Private and Denominational Institutions (Google eBook)

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News Print. Company, 1885 - Education - 99 pages
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Page 38 - Neither the General Assembly nor any county, city, town, township, school district, or other public corporation, shall ever make any appropriation or pay from any public fund whatever, anything in aid of any church or sectarian purpose, or to help support or sustain any school, academy, seminary, college, university, or other literary or scientific institution controlled by any church or sectarian denomination whatever...
Page 38 - Neither the general assembly nor any county, city, town, township, school district or other public corporation shall ever make any appropriation or pay from any public fund whatever, anything in aid of any church or sectarian purpose, or to help support or sustain any school, academy, seminary, college, university or other literary or scientific institution, controlled by any church or sectarian denomination whatever; nor shall any grant or donation of land, money or other personal property ever...
Page 49 - Baker moved that a committee of five be appointed to nominate officers for the next year, which was carried.
Page 12 - Instruction, with the additional duty of recommending to the several school districts a uniform series of text books, to be used in the schools thereof.
Page 32 - Colorado, moved that a committee of five be appointed by the Chair to take action on the report of the Committee on Instruction in Physics in the common schools.
Page 93 - In 1874, the Territorial Legislature appropriated $15,000, and the citizens of Boulder contributed a like sum in cash. In 1875, Congress set apart and reserved seventy-two sections of the public lands for the support of the State University. In 1876, the Constitution of Colorado provided that upon its adoption the University at Boulder should become an institution of the State, thus entitling it to lands appropriated by Congress, and further made provision for the management and control of the University.
Page 13 - ... Territory, one claim of one hundred feet in length on such lode shall be set apart and held in perpetuity for the use and benefit of schools in this Territory, subject to the control of the Legislative Assembly."3 This seemed to promise an ample support for the schools, but the actual results were insignificant. " Not one per cent, of the thousands of claims so located ever contributed a dollar to the school fund."4 In the year 1865 the inhabitants of the Territory elected delegates to a constitutional...
Page 12 - ... session a university was incorporated, to be located at Boulder. The act providing for a university remained a dead letter on the statute-books until 1870.* At the second session of the Legislature a novel method was adopted to raise the ordinary school revenues. A part of the act reads as follows : " That hereafter when any new mineral lode of either gold bearing quartz, silver, or other valuable metal shall be discovered in this Territory, one claim of one hundred feet in length on such lode...
Page 35 - Colorado; each member shall sign the constitution and pay one dollar annually. Honorary members may be elected at any annual meeting, and may participate in the debates, but not be entitled to vote.
Page 93 - ... the university. The first general assembly of the State made provision for its permanent support by a levy of a tax of one-fifth of a mill upon the property of the State; also for a fund to be secured by the sale of lands donated by the United States.

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