Sun in a Bottle: The Strange History of Fusion and the Science of Wishful Thinking (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Oct 30, 2008 - Science - 304 pages
12 Reviews
With his knack for translating science into understandable, anecdotal prose and his trademark dry humor, award-winning science writer Charles Seife presents the first narrative account of the history of fusion for general readers in more than a decade. Tracing the story from its beginning into the twenty-first century, Sun in a Bottle reveals fusion's explosive role in some of the biggest scientific scandals of all time. Throughout this journey, he introduces us to the daring geniuses, villains, and victims of fusion science. With the giant international fusion project ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) now under construction, it's clear that the science of wishful thinking is as strong as ever. This book is our key to understanding why.
  

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Review: Sun in a Bottle: The Strange History of Fusion and the Science of Wishful Thinking

User Review  - Filipe Dias - Goodreads

Wonderful insight on the history of Fusion and the dreams of Scientists and the Public on the infinite energy. The dream to save Humanity forever. Alas it has not come to it, maybe will never be ... Read full review

Review: Sun in a Bottle: The Strange History of Fusion and the Science of Wishful Thinking

User Review  - Damon - Goodreads

Loved this book. Great mix of information and storytelling. Fascinating subject. Read full review

All 4 reviews »

Contents

THE SWORD OF MICHAEL
THE VALLEY OF IRON
KINKS INSTABILITIES AND BALONEY BOMBS
HEAT AND LIGHT
THE COLD SHOULDER
SECRETS
NOTHING LIKE THE SUN
THE SCIENCE OF WISHFUL THINKING
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Charles Seife is the author of five previous books, including Proofiness and Zero, which won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for first nonfiction and was a New York Times notable book. He has written for a wide variety of publications, including The New York Times, Wired, New Scientist, Science, Scientific American, and The Economist. He is a professor of journalism at New York University and lives in New York City.

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