The Science of Good and Evil: Why People Cheat, Gossip, Care, Share, and Follow the Golden Rule

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Macmillan, Jan 2, 2005 - Philosophy - 368 pages
52 Reviews
From bestselling author Michael Shermer, an investigation of the evolution of morality that is "a paragon of popularized science and philosophy" The Sun (Baltimore)

A century and a half after Darwin first proposed an "evolutionary ethics," science has begun to tackle the roots of morality. Just as evolutionary biologists study why we are hungry (to motivate us to eat) or why sex is enjoyable (to motivate us to procreate), they are now searching for the very nature of humanity.

In The Science of Good and Evil, science historian Michael Shermer explores how humans evolved from social primates to moral primates; how and why morality motivates the human animal; and how the foundation of moral principles can be built upon empirical evidence.

Along the way he explains the implications of scientific findings for fate and free will, the existence of pure good and pure evil, and the development of early moral sentiments among the first humans. As he closes the divide between science and morality, Shermer draws on stories from the Yanamamö, infamously known as the "fierce people" of the tropical rain forest, to the Stanford studies on jailers' behavior in prisons. The Science of Good and Evil is ultimately a profound look at the moral animal, belief, and the scientific pursuit of truth.
  

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Review: The Science of Good and Evil: Why People Cheat, Gossip, Care, Share, and Follow the Golden Rule

User Review  - Mindi Beal - Goodreads

This book deepened my Michael Shermer brain crush. He has a real talent for communicating potentially-dry subjects in a funny and engaging format. A compelling, secular examination of morality that increased my faith that most people are instinctively good most of the time. Read full review

Review: The Science of Good and Evil: Why People Cheat, Gossip, Care, Share, and Follow the Golden Rule

User Review  - Paul - Goodreads

An evolutionary view of morality. Very readable. I found myself agreeing with about 95% of it. My main area of disagreement is his preference for libertarianism as a political system. Of course he is ... Read full review

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Contents

ONE LONG ARGUMENT
1
THE ORIGINS OF MORALITY
13
TRANSCENDENT MORALITY HOW EVOLUTION ENNOBLES ETHICS
15
WHY WE ARE MORAL THE EVOLUTIONARY ORIGINS OF MORALITY
24
WHY WE ARE IMMORAL WAR VIOLENCE AND THE IGNOBLE SAVAGE WITHIN
65
MASTER OF MY FATE MAKING MORAL CHOICES IN A DETERMINED UNIVERSE
105
A SCIENCE OF PROVISIONAL ETHICS
139
CAN WE BE GOOD WITHOUT GOD? SCIENCE RELIGION AND MORALITY
141
HOW WE ARE MORAL ABSOLUTE RELATIVE AND PROVISIONAL ETHICS
157
HOW WE ARE IMMORAL RIGHT AND WRONG AND WRONG AND HOW TO TELL THE DIFFERENCE
181
RISE ABOVE TOLERANCE FREEDOM AND THE PROSPECTS FOR HUMANITY
223
THE DEVIL UNDER FORM OF BABOON THE EVOLUTION OF EVOLUTIONARY ETHICS
265
MORAL AND RELIGIOUS UNIVERSALS AS A SUBSET OF HUMAN UNIVERSALS
285
NOTES
293
Copyright

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References from web pages

The Science of Good and Evil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Science of Good and Evil is a book by Michael Shermer on ethics and evolutionary psychology. The book was published in 2004 by Henry Holt and Company ...
en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/ The_Science_of_Good_and_Evil

Michael Shermer » The Science of Good and Evil
One Comment to “The Science of Good and Evil”. Michael Lee Says: March 10th, 2008 at 1:13 pm. “we can construct an ethical system that generates a morality ...
www.michaelshermer.com/ science-good-evil/

The Science of Good and Evil | Humanist | Find Articles at BNET.com
The Science of Good and Evil from Humanist in Reference provided free by Find Articles.
findarticles.com/ p/ articles/ mi_m1374/ is_6_64/ ai_n8582446

Macmillan Academic Marketing
The psychologist and science historian Michael Shermer has written widely on the nature of belief, and The Science of Good and Evil is a provocative ...
www.macmillanacademic.com/ Academic/ Book/ BookDisplay.asp?BookKey=2021148

Michael Shermer on The Science of Good and Evil • videosift ...
"Michael Shermer's tour for his book The Science of Good and Evil, found him here explaining why we are moral, the evolutionary origins of the moral ...
www.videosift.com/ video/ Michael-Shermer-on-The-Science-of-Good-and-Evil

The Science Of Good And Evil: Book News
In The Science of Good and Evil, science historian Michael Shermer explores how humans evolved from social primates to moral primates; how and why morality ...
bookne.ws/ book/ 0805077693/ the-science-of-good-and-evil

Integral Options Cafe: Michael Shermer on The Science of Good and Evil
Tags: Michael Shermer, The Science of Good and Evil, morality, psychology, neuroscience, evolution. Labels: morality, Psychology, Science ...
integral-options.blogspot.com/ 2007/ 12/ michael-shermer-on-science-of-good-and.html

The non-science of good and evil Austin Dacey October 2005
produced almost 300 pages of The Science of Good and Evil despite there being no such thing as. a science of good and evil. There is such a thing as science ...
www.austindacey.com/ pdf/ The_nonscience_of_good_and_evil.pdf

Something Evil Comes This Way
(Michael Shermer is publisher of Skeptic magazine, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, and the author of The Science of Good and Evil). ...
www.ofgodandlogic.com/ morality/ somethingevil/ index.htm

What is the best book you've read for relaxation this summer? 1 ...
"The Science of Good and Evil" by Michael Shermer (USA). 3. "Paladin of Souls" by Lois mcmaster Bujold (USA). 4. "The Blank Slate" by S. Pinker. ...
promo.aaas.org/ kn_marketing/ poll0804.shtml

About the author (2005)

Michael Shermer is the author of The Believing Brain, Why People Believe Weird Things, The Science of Good and Evil, The Mind Of The Market, Why Darwin Matters, Science Friction, How We Believe and other books on the evolution of human beliefs and behavior. He is the founding publisher of Skeptic magazine, the editor of Skeptic.com, a monthly columnist for Scientific American, and an adjunct professor at Claremont Graduate University. He lives in Southern California.

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