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Books Books 1 - 10 of 44 on Vattel, domicil, which he defines to be, " a habitation fixed in any place, with....  
" Vattel, domicil, which he defines to be, " a habitation fixed in any place, with an intention of always staying there. "
Massachusetts Reports: Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Judicial ... - Page 483
by Massachusetts. Supreme Judicial Court - 1864
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Reports of two cases determined in the prize court for the New York district

United States. District Court (New York), Charles Johnson, Robert Falconer, John Richardson, William Falconer, James Beswicke - Law - 1814 - 59 pages
...citizen or subject of the country in which the resi. deuce is established. " The domicil," says Vattel, " is the habitation fixed in any place with an intention of always staying there. A man does not then establish his domicil in any place, unless he makes sufficiently known his intention...
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The American Law Journal, Volume 6

John Elihu Hall - Law - 1817
...citizen or subject of the country in which the residence is established. " The domicil," says Vattel, " is the habitation fixed in any place with an intention of always staying there. A man does not then establish his domicil in any place, unless he makes sufficiently known his intention...
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Register of Debates in Congress: Comprising the Leading Debates and ...

United States. Congress, Joseph Gales, William Winston Seaton - Law - 1834
...establishment, though it is abandoned in a longer or shorter period." Vattel also says, that the "domicil is the habitation fixed in any place with an intention of always staying there." Thus we see, sir, that time is not so essential as intent and that a man cannot be esteemed a citizen...
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Reports of Criminal Law Cases Decided at the City-Hall of the City ..., Volume 3

Jacob D. Wheeler - Criminal law - 1825
...citizen or subject of the country in which the residence is established. " The domicil," says Vattel, " is the habitation fixed in any place with an intention of always staying there. A man does not then establish his domicil in any place, unless he makes sufficiently known his intention...
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Cases of contested elections in Congress: from the year 1789 to 1834, inclusive

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Elections - Political Science - 1834 - 1025 pages
...is doubted whether the question be not too purely American, ) we find the following : " The domicil is the habitation fixed in any place, with an intention of always staying there. A man does not then establish his domicil in any place, unless he makes sufficiently known his intention...
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A Treatise on the Right of Suffrage: With an Appendix

Samuel Jones, Samuel Jones (of Stockbridge, Mass.) - Suffrage - 1842 - 274 pages
...be required as evidence of membership ? This depends upon one's domicil and residence. " The domicil is the habitation fixed in any place with an intention of always staying there. A man does not then establish * At Athens, a stranger, who intermeddled with the assemblies of the...
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Reports of decisions in the Supreme Court of the United States ..., Volume 3

United States. Supreme Court, Benjamin Robbins Curtis - Law reports, digests, etc - 1855
...are united and subject to the society, without participating in all its advantages." " The domicile is the habitation fixed in any place, with an intention of always staying there. A man does not, then, establish his domicile in any place, unless he makes sufficiently known his intention...
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Massachusetts Reports: Cases Argued and Determined in the ..., Volumes 10-11

Massachusetts. Supreme Judicial Court - Law reports, digests, etc - 1864
...Monday of April, 1813. The material question, however, on which the cause must turn, is, whether lie was an inhabitant of that town on that day, within...chambers, as at a college, and boarding in commons. He was, in fact, an undergraduate there ; as it appears that the students in divinity are, at the end...
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The American Law Register, Volume 3

Law reports, digests, etc - 1864
...meet with general acceptance. Bynkershoek declined hazarding a definition. Vattel defined it to be " the habitation fixed in any place, with an intention of always staying there ;" but this has been complained of as too strict, if taken literally to govern in a question relating...
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