America's Greatest Flood and Tornado Calamity: Authentic Story of These Appalling Disasters : Graphic and Complete Accounts of the Terrible Floods in Ohio, Indiana and Other States ; Hundreds Swept Into Eternity ; Soul-stirring Stories Told by Eyewitnesses : Nation Responds to President Wilson's Appeal for Aid : The Omaha Tornado Killed Many People and Destroyed and Wrecked Thousands of Homes ; Thrilling Accounts of Miraculous Escapes from Death ; Millions of Dollars Worth of Property Destroyed (Google eBook)

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J. Martin Miller
Thomas H. Morrison, 1913 - Floods - 320 pages
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Contents

I
27
II
33
III
49
IV
59
V
71
VI
85
VII
91
VIII
111
XV
175
XVI
191
XVII
207
XVIII
215
XIX
221
XX
239
XXI
255
XXII
267

IX
131
X
153
XI
163
XII
167
XIII
171
XIV
173
XXIII
273
XXIV
279
XXV
287
XXVI
295
XXVII
317

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Page 4 - And, behold, the LORD passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and brake in pieces the rocks before the LORD ; but the LORD was not in the wind : and after the wind an earthquake ; but the LORD was not in the earthquake : and after the earthquake a fire; but the LORD was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice.
Page 21 - I have nought that is fair?" saith he; "Have nought but the bearded grain? Though the breath of these flowers is sweet to me, I will give them all back again.
Page 242 - ... and the mountains were cleared at such a rate that disastrous effects were felt within ten years. By 1803 the people had become aroused to the folly of this cutting. Where useful brooks had been there now rushed torrents which flooded the fertile fields and covered them with sterile soil washed down from the mountains. The clearing continued unchecked until some 800,000 acres of farm land had been ruined or seriously injured, and the population of eighteen Departments had been reduced to poverty...
Page 243 - France, then, forestry has decreased the danger from floods, which threatened to destroy vast areas of fertile farms, and in doing so has added many millions of dollars to the National wealth in. new forests. It has removed the danger from sand dunes; and in their place has created a property worth many millions of dollars.
Page 241 - ... Cevennes, and the Pyrenees mountains there are 1,462 brooks and mountain streams which are considered dangerous. Nearly a million acres of mountain slopes are exposed to erosion by these streams, to say nothing of the flat land below. As far back as the sixteenth century there were local restrictions against clearing mountain sides, enforced by fines, confiscation, and corporal punishment. In the main these prevented ruinous stripping of hillsides, but with the French Revolution these restrictions...
Page 253 - The calamity in Ohio and Indiana makes clearer than ever before the imperative and immediate necessity for a comprehensive and systematic plan for drainage and flood control.
Page 242 - ... who. moreover, were deprived of much pasturage. Complaints naturally arose. An attempt was made to check torrents by sodding instead of by forest planting. This, however, proved a failure, and recourse was again had to planting, by the law of 1882, which provides that the State shall bear the costs. Since then the excellent results of planting have completely changed public sentiment. The mountaineers are most eager to have the work go on and are ready to offer their land for nothing to the forest...
Page 155 - ... were breaking out, not dangerous, as it turned out, but enough to completely upset already overwrought nerves. WHOLE LEVEE WASHED AWAY. As I stood in my skyscraper window, I saw the levee which protected the entire west side, suddenly melt into the river. I saw a dozen men, linemen from the telegraph companies, apparently, struggle to keep the poles up. It was hopeless. As I was looking, the poles began to drop. One struck a group of linemen, the connecting wires felling them in all directions....
Page 153 - ... perfectly safe skyscraper looking over ninety square miles of water punctured by thousands of homes 15,000 or 20,000, at least swirling water carrying them away one by one, or sometimes literally in swarms, and you will have some conception of what we saw in Columbus Tuesday and Wednesday. Bridges crashed at our feet' a new one every hour. With our field glasses we could see thousands of people on roofs and in windows as effectively cut off from the world as they would have been in...
Page 253 - Mr. Edmund T. Perkins said : "Knowing that such catastrophes are needless," the National Drainage Congress accepts the responsibility of "presenting to the people and the Congress of the United States a plan to alleviate and prevent the recurrence of loss of life and property." The National Drainage Congress. An association known as the National Irrigation Congress has been in existence for 20 years. The chief interest of this organization is in the reclamation of waste and arid lands by irrigation....

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