Court and Bakufu in Japan: Essays in Kamakura History

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Jeffrey P. Mass
Stanford University Press, Jan 1, 1995 - History - 324 pages
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The Kamakura period, 1180-1333, is known as the era of Japan's first warrior government. However, these essays show that the period was notable for the coexistence of two centres of authority: the Bakufu military government at Kamakura and the civilian cou
  

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Contents

CourtBakufu Relations in Kamakura Japan
3
The Imperial Court as a Legal Authority in the Kamakura
29
Hierarchy and Economics in Early Medieval Todaiji Joan R Piggott
45
Suo Province in the Age of Kamakura Peter J Amesen
92
The Early Bakufu and Feudalism Jeffrey P Mass
123
The Hojo Family and Succession to Power H Paul Varley
143
The Hojo and Consultative Government Andrew Goble
168
The Zen Monastery in Kamakura Society Martin Collcutt
191
Social Control and the Significance of Akuto Lorraine F Harrington
221
Epilogue John W Hall
251
Old and New Approaches to Kamakura History TakeuchiRizd
268
Glossary
285
Bibliography
299
Index
311
List of Contributors
323
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About the author (1995)

Jeffrey P. Mass is Yamato Ichihashi Professor of Japanese History and Civilization at Stanford University. He is the author or editor of eight other books published by Stanford University Press, most recently" The Origins of Japan's Medieval World: Courtiers, Clerics, Warriors, and Peasants in the Fourteenth Century "(editor, 1997).

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