The army ration: how to diminish its weight and bulk, secure economy in its administration, avoid waste, and increase the comfort, efficiency, and mobility of troops (Google eBook)

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D. Van Nostrand, 1864 - 44 pages
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Page 8 - the flesh of mammalia undergoes a great change in its nutritive qualities by reason of fasting, disturbance of sleep, and long continued suffering, resulting in its becoming not only worthless but deleterious.
Page 1 - The Army Ration. How to diminish its Weight and Bulk, secure Economy in its Administration, avoid Waste, and increase the Comfort, Efficiency, and Mobility of Troops.
Page 22 - The edible meat would therefore cost some three to four times as much, say $1.25 per pound, and with its water eliminated, $5 per pound. A medical officer, whose duties called him to Chattanooga, during the months preceding the battle of Lookout Mountain, has informed me that the cattle furnished to that post were so sick and exhausted from the effects of the transportation from Louisville, and so reduced and emaciated from having had absolutely nothing to eat on the railroad and after their arrival,...
Page 22 - L know not, but probably not less than the cattle supplied to the Army .of the Potomac, while their value for food must have been less and the cost of the ration of fresh beef correspondingly greater.
Page 20 - An ox in fair condition weighing 1,500 pounds on the hoof, would lose by shrinkage 500 pounds.* The intestinal tallow would weigh 100 pounds more, the head and hide 100 pounds more, and the kidney tallow and lump fat 50 pounds more. Altogether, the dressed quarters without the kidney tallow and lump fat, weigh but half the ox on foot.
Page 22 - ... in succession, that some of them reeled in walking, and falling or lying down were unable to rise. It is true that the bullocks that thus fell were not eaten, but they indicate the condition of those which had been subjected to the same suffering and deprivations and were actually used as food. What these cattle on the hoof cost the Government...
Page 20 - ... meat is much of it lost in the difficulty and haste of detaching it from the bones. It has no provision against spontaneous decay. It is not always at command when most needed ; it is bulky, and yet the actual edible meat, which the soldier derives from an ox slaughtered on the march, is much less than is ordinarily supposed. The advantage of providing it on the hoof is correspondingly small. In slaughtering, the weight is diminished by loss of blood, the removal of the tongue, heart, and liver,...
Page 20 - The edible meat is much of it lost in the difficulty and haste of detaching it from the bones; it has no provision against spontaneous decay; it is not always at command when most needed; it is bulky, and yet the actual edible meat which the soldier derives from an ox slaughtered on the march is much less than is ordinarily supposed. The advantage of providing it on the hoof is correspondingly small. "In slaughtering, the weight is diminished by loss of blood, the removal of the tongue, heart, and...
Page 20 - The intestinal tallow would weigh 100 pounds more, the head and hide 100 pounds mor%, and the kidney tallow and lump fat 50 pounds more. Altogether, the dressed quarters without the kidney tallow and lump fat, weigh but half * the ox on foot. But the bones, gristle, tendon, connective tissue, and loss of meat in the sinuosities of the back bone and along the ribs, reduce the edible...
Page 22 - ... cost 36 cents, bone, tendon, and gristle included. The edible meat would therefore cost some three to four times as much, say $1 25 per pound, and with its water eliminated, $5 per pound. A medical officer, whose duties called him to Chattanooga, during the months preceding the battle of...

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