In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali

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Edward C. Dimock, Denise Levertov
University of Chicago Press, 1967 - Poetry - 95 pages
5 Reviews
Arising out of a devotional and enthusiastic religious movement that swept across most of northern and eastern India in the period from the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, the powerful and moving lyrics collected and elegantly translated here depict the love of Radha for the god Krishna—a love whose intensity and range of emotions trace the course of all true love between man and woman and between man and God. Intermingling physical and metaphysical imagery, the spiritual yearning for the divine is articulated in the passionate language of intense sensual desire for an irresistible but ultimately unpossessable lover, thus touching a resonant chord in our humanity.
  

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Review: In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali

User Review  - Ivan M. - Goodreads

I wanted to love this collection, but I will settle for liking it instead. Even with a great poet like Denise Levertov as one of the translators, I have to say these English renderings don't quite ... Read full review

Review: In Praise of Krishna: Songs from the Bengali

User Review  - Ivan Granger - Goodreads

I wanted to love this collection, but I will settle for liking it instead. Even with a great poet like Denise Levertov as one of the translators, I have to say these English renderings don't quite ... Read full review

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
v
INTRODUCTION
vii
Gaurachandrikā
1
Prūvarāga
5
Prathama milan
9
Anurāga
13
Milan
19
Āksepānurāga
25
Māna
47
Milan
53
Mathurā
59
Sammilan
63
Nibedan
67
NOTES
71
ON TRANSLATION AND TRANSLITERATION
73
ON VAISHNAVA DOCTRINE
77

Āptadūtī
35
Māna Kalahāntaritā
39
Māna
43
ON THE POETS
81
NOTES TO THE POEMS
85
Copyright

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About the author (1967)

Professor emeritus of South Asian languages at the University of Chicago, Edward Cameron Dimock first went to India in 1955, where he lived and taught for many years. A Fulbright Scholar, Dimock has received numerous awards and honors, including those from the National Academy of Letters in New Delhi and the India League of America. He is on the board of trustees at the American Institute of Indian Studies, where he was president from 1972 to 1987. He now lives with his wife on Cape Cod and travels to India several times a year.

Born in Essex, England, Denise Levertov became a U.S. citizen after her marriage to Mitchell Goodman, the writer who was indicted, with Benjamin Spock and the Rev. William Sloane Coffin, for his antiwar activities. She came to New York to live in 1948. Levertov acknowledges that her writing was influenced by William Carlos Williams, Charles Olson, and Robert Duncan. After her first book, The Double Image (1946), was published in England in 1946, she did not produce another volume until 1957, when City Lights brought out Here and Now. In 1961 she was poetry editor for the Nation, and in 1965 she received the grant in literature from the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Her essays collected in The Poet in the World (1973) and Light Up the Cave are written with a penetrating intelligence. Winner of numerous awards and prizes, she is a poet of reverence and fierce moral drive.

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