American History: A Survey, Volume 1

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McGraw-Hill, 1991 - History - 544 pages
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This survey aims to balance social and cultural with the political and diplomatic history. It aims to help instructor to organize his or her course in many different ways confident that the text will support both the topics discussed in class and provide students with the ideal book for self-study.

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Contents

Significant Events
25
The Restoration Colonies
45
The Development of Empire
53
Copyright

33 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Alan Brinkley was born in 1949. He earned his Ph.D. at Harvard University and taught at MIT and Harvard as well as City University of New York and Princeton University before joining the Columbia faculty in 1991. He is the Allan Nevins Professor of History at Columbia University, where he was also Provost from 2003 - 2009. He is a historian of the New Deal. A prolific essayist, Brinkley writes regularly in magazines such as The New York Review of Books, the New York Times Book Review, Newsweek and The New Republic and is an advocate for progressive issues. Brinkley has won a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, the National Book Award for History, and numerous other prizes and fellowships, and was elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also serves as a board member or trustee of several academic and policy research institutions and chairs the board of The Century Foundation. His works include Liberalism and Its Discontents, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century.

Born in Colorado City, Colorado, on October 5, 1912, Richard Nelson Current received his B.A. from Oberlin College and went on to earn an M.S. at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and a Ph.D. in history (1939) at the University of Wisconsin. Current taught at a number of institutions, including Rutgers University, Lawrence College, Mills College, the University of Illinois, and the University of Wisconsin before becoming Distinguished Professor of American History at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (1966--1983). He also taught in Japan, India, the Netherlands, Australia, Chile, and Germany. He was Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University. Current wrote about historical subjects ranging from the invention of the typewriter to American diplomacy. In 2000, he won the Lincoln Prize for lifetime achievement in the area of best non-fiction historical work pertaining to the American Civil War . Current died on October 26, 2012 at age 100. He is buried in Greensboro, NC.

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