Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate of the United States of America (Google eBook)

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D. Green, 1887 - Legislation
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Page 195 - Provided, that this shall only be done upon such evidence of criminality as, according to the laws of the place where the fugitive or person so charged shall be found, would justify his apprehension and commitment for trial if the crime or offence had there been committed...
Page 216 - Kansas, and when admitted as a state or states, the said territory, or any portion of the same, shall be received into the union with or without slavery, as their constitution may prescribe at the time of their admission...
Page 247 - The United States of America and her Majesty, the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain...
Page 211 - March next, at twelve o'clock at noon on that day, of which all who shall at that time be entitled to act as members of that body are hereby required to take notice. Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, at...
Page 216 - Measures, is hereby declared inoperative and void ; it being the true intent and meaning of this act not to legislate Slavery into any Territory or State, nor to exclude it therefrom, but to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form and regulate their domestic institutions in their own way, subject only to the Constitution of the United States...
Page 221 - Payment of money out of the contingent fund of the Senate or creating a charge upon the same (except that any resolution relating to substantive matter within the jurisdiction of any other standing committee of the Senate shall be first referred to such committee).
Page 137 - Resolved (two-thirds of the Senators present concurring), That the Senate advise and consent to the...
Page 219 - Our diplomacy should be direct and frank neither seeking to obtain more nor accepting less than is our due. We ought to cherish a sacred regard for the independence of all nations, and never attempt to interfere in the domestic concerns of any, unless this shall be imperatively required by the great law of selfpreservation.
Page 220 - ... on this principle, no nation will have a right to interfere or to complain if in the progress of events we shall still further extend our possessions. Hitherto in all our acquisitions the people, under the protection of the American flag, have enjoyed civil and religious liberty, as well as equal and just laws, and have been contented, prosperous, and happy. Their trade with the rest of the world has rapidly increased, and thus every commercial nation has shared largely in their successful progress....
Page 211 - March next, at 12 o'clock at noon on that day, of which all who shall at that time be entitled to act as members of that body are hereby required to take notice. Given under my hand and the seal of the United States, at Washington...

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