Report of the ... Conference, Volumes 13-15 (Google eBook)

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W. Clowes and Sons, 1887 - International law
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Page 197 - ... arrests, restraints, and detainments of all kings, princes, and people, of what nation, condition, or quality soever, barratry of the master and mariners, and of all other perils, losses, and misfortunes, that have or shall come to the hurt, detriment, or damage of the said goods and merchandises, and ship, etc., or any part thereof.
Page 105 - Damage to or loss of cargo, fuel or stores caused in the act of handling, discharging, storing, reloading and stowing shall be made good as general average, when and only when the cost of those measures respectively is admitted as general average. Rule XIII Deductions from Cost of Repairs In adjusting claims for general average, repairs to be allowed in general average shall be subject to deductions in respect of „new for old...
Page 277 - When a ship shall have entered or been detained in any port or place in consequence of accident, sacrifice or other extraordinary circumstances which render that necessary for the common safety...
Page 197 - And it is agreed by us, the insurers, that this writing or policy of assurance shall be of as much force and effect as the surest writing or policy of assurance heretofore made in Lombard Street, or in the Royal Exchange, or elsewhere in London.
Page 87 - ... loading in consequence of accident, sacrifice or other extraordinary circumstances which render that necessary for the common safety, the expenses of entering such port or place shall be admitted as general average; and when she shall have sailed thence with her original cargo, or a part of it, the corresponding expenses of leaving such port or place consequent upon such entry or return shall likewise be admitted as general average.
Page 160 - If a ship under average be in a port or place at which it Is practicable to repair her, so as to enable her to carry on the whole cargo...
Page 202 - Metal sheathing for wooden or composite ships shall be dealt with by allowing in full the cost of a weight equal to the gross weight of metal sheathing stripped off, minus the proceeds of the old metal. Nails, felt and labour metalling are subject to a deduction of one-third.
Page 167 - Ship's materials and stores, or any of them, necessarily burnt for fuel for the common safety at a time of peril, shall be admitted as general average, when and only when an ample supply of fuel had been provided ; but the estimated quantity of...
Page 279 - One-third to be deducted off repairs to and renewal of woodwork of hull, masts, and spars, furniture, upholstery, crockery, metal, and glassware, also sails, rigging, ropes, sheets, and hawsers (other than wire and chain), awnings, covers and painting. One-sixth to be deducted off wire rigging, wire ropes and wire hawsers, chain cables and chains, donkey engines, steam winches and connections, steam cranes and connections ; other repairs in full.
Page 182 - The requisition for extradition shall be made through the Diplomatic Agents of the High Contracting Parties respectively. The requisition for the extradition of an accused person must be accompanied by a warrant of arrest issued by the competent authority of the State requiring the extradition, and by such evidence as, according to the laws of the place where the accused is found, would justify his arrest if the crime had been committed there.

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