Italian Journey, 1786-1788

Front Cover
Penguin, 1970 - Travel - 508 pages
20 Reviews
In 1786, when he was already the acknowledged leader of the Sturm und Drang literary movement, Goethe set out on a journey to Italy to fulfil a personal and artistic quest and to find relief from his responsibilities and the agonies of unrequited love. As he travelled to Venice, Rome, Naples and Sicily he wrote many letters, which he later used as the basis for the Italian Journey. A journal full of fascinating observations on art and history, and the plants, landscape and the character of the local people he encountered, this is also a moving account of the psychological crisis from which Goethe emerged newly inspired to write the great works of his mature years.
  

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Review: Italian Journey

User Review  - Majoringinliterature - Goodreads

Originally posted at Majoring in Literature Here's a question: what does an eighteenth-century gentleman, with a fair amount of money, a comfortable desk job, and a passion for rocks and plants do ... Read full review

Review: Italian Journey

User Review  - Lydia Lui - Goodreads

"Nothing, above all, is comparable to the new life that a reflective person experiences when he observes a new country." Read full review

Contents

I
7
II
23
III
36
IV
52
V
74
VI
105
VII
128
VIII
179
XIV
369
XV
373
XVI
383
XVII
397
XVIII
415
XIX
425
XX
440
XXI
471

IX
223
X
309
XI
343
XII
345
XIII
358
XXII
478
XXIII
487
XXIV
499
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About the author (1970)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in Frankfurt-on-Main in 1749. He studied at Leipzig, where he showed interest in the occult, and at Strassburg, where Herder introduced him to Shakespeare's works and to folk poetry. He produced some essays and lyrical verse, and at twenty-two wrote Götz von Berlichingen, a play which brought him national fame and established him in the current Sturm und Drang movement. This was followed by the novel The Sorrows of Young Werther in 1774, which was an even greater success.

Goethe began work on Faust, and Egmont, another tragedy before being invited to join the government of Weimar. His interest in the classical world led him to leave suddenly for Italy in 1786 and the Italian Journey recounts his travels there. Iphigenia in Tauris and Torquato Tasso, classical dramas, were written at this time. Returning to Weimar, Goethe started the second part of Faust, encouraged by Schiller. In 1806 he married Christiane Vulpius. During this late period he finished his series of Wilhelm Master books and wrote many other works, including The Oriental Divan (1819). He also directed the State Theatre and worked on scientific theories in evolutionary botany, anatomy and color. Goethe completed Faust in 1832, just before he died.
W.H. Auden was born in 1907 and went to Oxford University, where he became Professor of Poetry from 1956 to 1960. After the publication of his Poems in 1930, he became the acknowledged leader of the 'thirties poets'. His poetic output was prolific, and he also wrote verse plays in collaboration with Christopher Isherwood, with whom he visited china. In 1946 he became a U.S. citizen. He died in 1973.
Elizabeth Mayer was born in Mecklengurg in 1884 and emigrated to the U.S. in 1936. In collaboration with Louise Blogan she translated Werther and Elective Affinities

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