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" I suppose, have thus suffered; and if I had to live my life again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week; for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied would thus have been kept active through... "
The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin - Page 82
by Francis Darwin - 1887
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The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 117

American literature - 1916
...the final complete loss of those faculties through neglect. 'The loss of these tastes,' he says, ' is a loss of happiness, and may possibly be injurious...character by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.' The intellect of man, in itself, is never supreme or sufficient. Feeling or instinct is half of knowledge....
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The Congregational Review, Volume 2, Part 1

Religion - 1887
...life over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once a week, for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophied...character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.* Or again, the following extract from a letter, June 17, 1868, to Sir JD Hooker : I am glad you were...
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The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin: Including an ..., Volume 1

Charles Darwin - Naturalists - 1888
...not end unhappily against which a law ought to be passed. A novel, according to my taste, docs not come into the first class unless it contains some...character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature.V^ My books have sold largely in England, have been translated into many languages, and passed...
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The Ohio Educational Monthly and the National Teacher: A Journal ..., Volume 37

Education - 1888
...alone, on which the higher tastes depend, I cannot conceive. A man with a mind more highly organized or better constituted than mine, would not, I suppose,...character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature." (I., 81, 82). Mr. Darwin uses the right word; part of his brain had become "atrophied;" but he is mistaken...
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Ohio Educational Monthly, Volume 37

Education - 1888
...alone, on which the higher tastes depend, I cannot conceive. A man with a mind more highly organized or better constituted than mine, would not, I suppose,...character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature." (I., Si, 82). Mr. Darwin uses the right word; part of his brain had become "atrophied;" but he is mistaken...
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The Musical World, Volume 68

Music - 1888
...again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week. The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness, and...character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature." Surely words like these, deliberately written by a man of such great, and at the same time, such thoroughly...
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Congregationalism; free, broad & evangelical: an address, Volume 1

Robert Bruce - 1888
...intolerably dull that it nauseated me. I have also almost lost my taste for pictures and music. . . . The loss of these tastes is a loss of happiness and...character by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature." Our mission is to " the world " for which the Saviour died, not merely to "the world of culture." In...
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The Unitarian, Volume 4

Jabez Thomas Sunderland, Brooke Herford, Frederick B. Mott - Liberalism (Religion) - 1889
...and listen to some music at least once every week, for perhaps the parts of my brain now atrophidd would thus have been kept active through use. The...moral character, by enfeebling the emotional part of my nature." Had Darwin been as well informed in psychology as he was in those sciences to which ho...
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The Presbyterian Quarterly: 1889, Volume 3

Presbyterianism - 1889
...listen to some music at least once every week; for perhaps the part of my brain now atrophied would then have been kept active through use. The loss of these...intellect, and more probably to the moral character." Would that he had early in life adopted some such rule; and in the same spirit and for the same, if...
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Natural Religion: From the "Apologie Des Christenthums" of Franz Hettinger ...

Franz Hettinger - Apologetics - 1890 - 302 pages
...music at least every week, for perhaps the part of my brain now atrophied would have been kept alive through use. The loss of these tastes is a loss of...character, by enfeebling the emotional part of our nature" (Life, 4th Edition). Tyndall also speaks of the logical feebleness of science. Cf. Mivart, Genesii...
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