Comparing Asian Politics: India, China, and Japan

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Westview Press, 2004 - History - 336 pages
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Comparing Asian Politics presents an unusual comparative examination of politics and government in three Asian nations: India, China, and Japan. Sue Ellen M. Charlton artfully points out both the unique and shared features of politics in these Asian countries. The author elucidates the links between politics and each nation's distinctive cultural and historical contexts and, at the same time, demonstrates the intermingling and grafting of Asian traditions with the influence of Western values and institutions. National identity, political cohesion, and socioeconomic change emerge as central to how politics has developed in each nation-state. Charlton provides insight into such topics as the significance of constitutions in the political process; the parliamentary system in Asia; the regionalization of politics and the importance of levels of government; the decay of one-party rule; state authority; and the development of grassroots politics. Selected public policy questions for each country are introduced early in the book in order to acquaint readers with political controversies that are important both domestically and internationally. Often these focus on the role of ethnic minorities, women, and regional groups in Asian political processes.Unlike many comparative studies, this book not only illuminates the politics of India, China, and Japan in relation to one another, it also suggests to readers how their own experience of politics can be informed by understanding the politics and government of these three Asian nations.
  

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Contents

People and Politics
19
China
43
Japan
65
The Foundation of Politics
87
Recreating the Chinese Nation
115
Tension in Tradition
137
Form and Substance
157
India and Japan
179
The PartyState System
201
Levels of Government and Regionalism
223
The Individual and the State
245
The Politics of Development and the Development of Politics
273
Asian Politics and Global Transformation
299
Glossary
323
About the Book and Author
331
Copyright

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Page 159 - ... that the ownership and control of the material resources of the community are so distributed as best to subserve the common good; (c) that the operation of the economic system does not result in the concentration of wealth and means of production to the common detriment...
Page 32 - It shall be the duty of the Union to promote the spread of the Hindi language, to develop it so that it may serve as a medium of expression for all the elements of the composite culture of India and to secure its enrichment by assimilating without interfering with its genius, the forms, style and expressions used in Hindustani and in the other languages of India specified in the Eighth Schedule, and by drawing, wherever necessary or desirable, for its vocabulary, primarily on Sanskrit and secondarily...
Page 143 - Our Imperial Ancestors have founded Our Empire on a basis broad and everlasting, and have deeply and firmly implanted virtue; Our subjects ever united in loyalty and filial piety have from generation to generation illustrated the beauty thereof. This is the glory of the fundamental character of Our Empire, and herein also lies the source of Our education. Ye, Our subjects, be filial to your parents, affectionate to your brothers and sisters; as husbands and wives be harmonious...
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Page 143 - The Way here set forth is indeed the teaching bequeathed by Our Imperial Ancestors, to be observed alike by Their Descendants and the subjects, infallible for all ages and true in all places. It is Our wish to lay it to heart in all reverence, in common with you. Our subjects, that we may all thus attain to the same virtue.
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About the author (2004)

Sue Ellen M. Charlton is professor of political science at Colorado State University where she teaches courses in comparative politics, international relations, and international development.

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