Wee Gillis

Front Cover
New York Review of Books, 2006 - Juvenile Fiction - 80 pages
19 Reviews
A Caldecott Honor Book by the creators of the beloved Story of Ferdinand

Wee Gillis lives in Scotland. He is an orphan, and he spends half of each year with his mother's people in the lowlands, while the other half finds him in the highlands with his father's kin. Both sides of Gillis's family are eager for him to settle down and adopt their ways. In the lowlands, he is taught to herd cattle, learning how to call them to him in even the heaviest of evening fogs. In the rocky highlands, he stalks stags from outcrop to outcrop, holding his breath so as not to make a sound. Wee Gillis is a quick study, and he soon picks up what his elders can teach him. And yet he is unprepared when the day comes for him to decide, once and for all, whether it will be the lowlands or the highlands that he will call his home.

Robert Lawson and Munro Leaf's classic picture book is a tribute to the powers of the imagination and a triumph of the storyteller's and illustrator's art.
  

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Review: Wee Gillis

User Review  - Krista Stevens - Goodreads

Won a Caldecott. Written and illustrated by the same men who wrote and illustrated "The Story of Ferdinand the Bull". Just didn't grab me. The illustrations only match the story and do not go beyond ... Read full review

Review: Wee Gillis

User Review  - Matthew Gilbert - Goodreads

Okay. It is now my goal to play Wee Gillis' set of bagpipes. I really liked this book (being a piper myself), the pictures are excellent, and the story is awesome! Read full review

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About the author (2006)

MUNRO LEAF (1905–1976) was an American writer, illustrator, and columnist whose books for children include Manners Can Be Fun and How to Behave and Why (both of which he also illustrated). In 1936 he “dashed off in 25 minutes” a story about a bull who preferred flowers to bullfights as a showcase for the artistic talent of his friend Robert Lawson. The Story of Ferdinand went on to become a best-seller and the two men collaborated on three subsequent books, Wee Gillis (1938), The Story of Simpson and Sampson (1941), and Aesop’s Fables (1941).
 
ROBERT LAWSON (1892-1957) was a prolific writer and illustrator of literature for children and was the first person ever to receive both the Newbery and Caldecott medals. Among his forty-odd books are such classic stories as Rabbit Hill, Ben and Me, and They Were Strong and Good.

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